fantasy flight games

Sorcery and Steam

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Sorcery and Steam (.pdf)

Author: Various
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
Publish Date: 08/2003
ISBN: 1-58994-115-2
Pages: 178
Rating: 3 out of 10
Retail Price: $24.95
($4.99 .pdf)

This 178-page supplement from Fantasy Flight Games is the work of writers Mark Chance, Gareth Hanrahan, Lizard, Brian Patterson, and Ross Watson, edited by Greg Benage. A 2003 publication, it is subtitled "A Resource for Steampunk Fantasy Adventure" and appears, visually speaking, as if it has been scanned into .pdf format from a paper product, judging by the segment of the lower half of the front cover that has been "snipped" off at the bottom of the on-screen page, and belongs to FFG's Legends and Lairs line. A quick browse of its catalogue entry at www.drivethrurpg.com shows that this impression is absolutely correct. It should also be noted that this e-book was published before the release of the 3.5 System Reference Document, and that it is therefore a 3.0 product.

Because of the initially questionable aesthetics of the product, it was with some trepidation that I continued on to read and consider the contents of the volume. Since I have already discussed the aesthetics of the book, I'll finish that discussion before I go on to write about the gaming content itself. Sorcery and Steam is a black and white product, and this includes its interior illustrations, which are greyscale images with a gritty or hazy feel to them which I think is nicely evocative of the ambiance of a Dickens novel. So they do a good job of reinforcing the "steampunk" flavor of this sourcebook. My favorite illustration is the one associated with the Brawler prestige class in Chapter Two; it reminds me of The Quiet Man, a film that featured John Wayne as a retired American boxer in rural Ireland of the early 20th century.

Having disposed of the matter of the product's appearance, we can now move on to a detailed review of the contents. The book consists of five chapters, each dealing with a different aspect of running a D&D game with an Industrial Age or "steampunk" flavor. The first chapter, in fact, is devoted entirely to a detailed discussion of what steampunk is, where the term came from, and what might be the consequences of including steampunk elements in a D&D campaign. There is only minimal "crunchy" material in this chapter, but it is nevertheless my favorite part of the book because it urges the reader to consider the premises on which he or she will be running or participating in "steampunk." On the one hand, as the chapter points out, steampunk can equate to a fantasy setting with the addition of Victorian mores, technology, and social class as motifs for the campaign. On the other hand, it can also encompass a more Wild West or pulp action feel, in the same vein as the motion pictures League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and Wild Wild West.

Similarly, steampunk can include wryly humorous but depressing social commentary like a Dickens novel, filled with criminals, beggars, and the working poor, or it can be boisterous high adventure, or anywhere in between. The chapter acknowledges these possibilities, and then proceeds into a discussion of the real difficulties associated with steampunk -unlike more traditional sub-genres of fantasy, it invites the players not to suspend disbelief with regard to details about daily life. Whereas the activities of peasants in traditional sword and sorcery gaming are of minimal importance to most players, in a game setting in which mass production can account for floods of black-market weapons the players are actively encouraged to question the effects of the possible intersection between magic and technology. The reason why I like the chapter is that it leaves it up to the individual reader to determine which flavor is desired, and merely provides a discussion of the likely consequences of an attempt to include such elements in a campaign—It encourages the DM or player to ask important questions about these concerns before they crop up as actual problems.

Chapter Two focuses on character classes, whether they are core classes from the classic D&D game as presented in the 3.0 SRD, or the new core classes presented in the book, or prestige classes. The discussion of core classes is really quite interesting, given that the book offers suggestions for interesting variants like an urban druid who receives modified class abilities to reflect their association with "the urban jungle." Even where there is no variant offered, there is a largely useful discussion of how a given class is likely to fit into a steampunk setting with growing industry, urban centers, and the social structures that rise from these innovations. The barbarian, for example, is subject to difficulties in a steampunk campaign because they represent a distinctly "uncivilized" approach to life, and may even live in tribal societies which fall prey to unprincipled members of industrial cultures. A goodly number of the core classes also receive additions to their class skill lists in order to bring them into line with a selection of mechanics delineated later in the book.

The section detailing new core classes is, in my opinion, distinctly less interesting and useful. Three core classes are presented in all; they the Animal Lord, the Artificer, and the Musketeer. Of the three, I am least impressed with the Animal Lord, which is a sort of totemic/nature character and fills a niche, which I think is better and more interestingly filled by the barbarian and/or the druid. I can only speculate that this class was meant to recall the old Tarzan pulp novels. The remaining two core classes are fine, though I also harbor doubts as to their necessity and flavor. The Artificer focuses on producing steam technology via the Craft skill, and gains rogue-like abilities to sabotage mechanical traps and the like. On the whole, I think a rogue can do the Artificer's job, and do it better and with greater versatility. The Musketeer is, predictably enough, a class focused on the use of gunpowder weapons. It has a few interesting class features, but on the whole I think that a fighter or ranger can easily do the same job. It would have made a good prestige class.

Finally, we come to the prestige classes. There are about a dozen of these, and my favorite is definitely the Gun Glyph, a nice option for wizards or fighter/wizards who like firearms. The keynote ability for the class is a reduction to arcane spell failure chances, coupled with the power to charge a specially-constructed firearm with the energy of a spell, ultimately of up to fourth level, which then affects a target struck by the bullet fired from the weapon. Along with each of the prestige classes in the section, there is a detailed description of an organization which includes a high proportion of members of the prestige class. This struck me as a nice touch, and could be useful as a source for adventure hooks and homebrewed organizations. Not all of the prestige classes fired my imagination; the Physician in particular seemed unsuited as a class for a PC, since it is lacking in combat skills and relegated to the role of a non-magical healer. Members of this class might be more interesting and useful in a low-magic campaign.

"Chapter Three: Skills, Feats, and Spells" introduces new uses for several existing skills, including creation DCs for two new kinds of alchemical item via the Alchemy skill, and other interesting new mechanics, like the use of the Appraise skill to determine an individual's social rank by his or her clothing. The chapter also offers a handful of new skills -- Drive (for steering mechanical vehicles), Munitions (for dealing with explosives and the like), and Use Steamcraft Device (for using mechanical items that don't fall under the Drive skill). Following new skills, the chapter puts forth new feats. Most of them are interesting, at the least. There is a chain of parry/riposte feats for duelists, which I don't care for because they bog down the conduct of the game, and I don't think that they improve the game sufficiently to be worth the extra dice rolls they call for.

On the other hand, there are some very nice feats here, too. My favorite is the Brew Injection feat, which functions similarly to the core books' Brew Potion feat. The nifty thing is that an injection is delivered via a hypodermic syringe, and can be administered to a hostile creature. It can also be used on an unconscious ally as a standard action instead of a full-round action. There is also a new feat descriptor - [Heritage]. Heritage feats are basically feat chains which must be started at 1st level, and build on each other to offer a series of unusually high skill bonuses to a selection of important skills. Most of these chains also grant some sort of special ability, as well, if they are pursued to their capstone feat. For example, the Industrial Upbringing chain starts with bonuses to Appraise and Craft skill checks. It proceeds up to the Industrial Master feat, which cuts crafting times in half for the Craft skill. The balance of the Heritage feat chains is haphazard. I probably would not use them in my own games.

Finally, there's s lengthy spells section to end the chapter. It's not very good; most of the spells are decidedly on the weak side, and a lot of them are mechanically awkward. A handful of them are basically revisions of core spells, like wall of lightning instead of wall of fire. This spell would actually be very nice, if it were sor/wiz 4 instead of sor/wiz 5. I am not sure why the authors of this section decided to give it a level hike, either -they offer a level 1 spell that is basically the same as magic missile, except that it deals 1d6+1 electrical damage and does not scale up with level. I was distinctly disappointed in the section as a whole. Not much of what you'll find here is likely to be worth using without some intervention by the DM.

"Chapter Four: Steamcraft and Black Powder" is notably more useful for someone who's interested in steampunk gaming. There is a plethora of new items here, divided into classifications like, "Scholars' Tools" and “Rogues' Tools." My favorite scholar's tool is the arcane flux detector, which basically acts like a Geiger counter for the detection of magical auras, and which also proves very helpful to rogues who're searching for magical traps and the like. It’s very nice. Also worth mention is the super-cool "steam portal." Essentially this is a very heavy solid iron gate, raised and lowered by a powerful steam engine that can only be activated by pressing a complicated series of buttons, or flipping an array of switches. It offers the solidity of a heavy fortress gate with the subtlety of the best dwarf-made locksmithing. Again, it’s very nice.

The purely mechanical devices of the chapter are followed by a decent selection of explosive devices -grenades, bombs, and the like. My biggest complaint is that none of these items offers a Reflex save to avoid or reduce their effects -if you're hit with one or end up in its splash radius, you simply take damage. This needs to be addressed if you use this gear. I suggest simply applying the save DCs associated with alchemist's fire, tanglefoot bags, and acid flasks.

The next section is very interesting indeed -it offers "steamcraft" armor. This is essentially the next step up from full plate. It's so heavy that a steam engine is incorporated into its structure to help make it possible to move in the stuff. For an additional price, this armor can then be fitted with assorted gizmos and gadgets -my favorite is the “firesprayer,” which is a very large flamethrower fed by an on-board fuel tank that holds enough juice for five blasts of alchemist's fire in a 30ft. cone. Owing to the delivery method, the fire deals more initial damage to affected creatures, which then run the risk of catching fire. If the fuel tank is ruptured, the entire contents ignite, however, and the wearer of the armor is likely to be roasted alive. I thought it was very cool.

There's also a rule set for handling malfunctions in clockwork, firearms, and steam technology. It's very complicated, though, and I think I would prefer to strip it down to something simpler -the malfunction system detailed in this source relies on d100 tables, and is therefore extensive and clunky, requiring consultation of a chart whenever a malfunction occurs.

The chapter closes out with a lengthy section on firearms. There are plenty of rules here, covering everything from reload times on muskets, to artillery, to bayonets. I'll pass over that in silence except to say that it's there, and that I might even use some of it. The coolest thing in the chapter is a nifty alchemical/magical fusion called alchemical gunpowder. It's expensive stuff, starting at 3 gp/musket or pistol shot, and working up to 80 gp per shot for powder that allows a bullet to pierce through a 3.0 outsider's damage reduction, up to DR/+5. Other effects include powder that fires even underwater or when damp, powder that adds fire or electrical damage, and powder that strikes incorporeal undead as if with a ghost touch property.

Finally, there's the fifth chapter, which deals with steam-powered vehicles and the application of the Drive skill. The rules for this are complicated, but I have yet to see a rule set for piloting or steering vehicles which was not. So it's serviceable, and I'd probably use it once I've had a chance to really pick it apart and see how it works in detail. It does require lots of dice rolls, though. I can tell that just from reading through it. There is also a listing of different sorts of vehicle, which is a fine thing if you want to drop vehicles into your game. If you're looking for rules on creating new vehicles, or modifying the examples provided, though, you're out of luck. I was disappointed about that.

Finally, I'll give my comments on the book as a whole. It ran for 24 dollars through DriveThruRPG when I bought it. To be very blunt, it was grossly overpriced, and not worth what I paid for it. It now sells for $4.99 in US funds, but on the whole I think that I wouldn't buy it, if I had it to do over. There are no bookmarks in this .pdf; there's an index, but you have to scroll all the way down to it, find what you want, and then scroll back up. It's really annoying, and there's no reasonable excuse for a professional publication in .pdf format to be without bookmarks. I'd rather pay 40 dollars for a print publication by Wizards of the Coast, even with their remarkably shoddy editing and playtesting on Player's Guide to Faerûn and Complete Divine, or pay 7 dollars a pop for Malhavoc Press's more recent publications.

There's some usable mechanical content, and there's a lot of commentary on the how of running a steampunk campaign, from a DM's perspective. But the majority of the mechanical stuff is confusing, badly edited, or haphazardly balanced, and it makes up the majority of the book. Someone might be able to use it, but I'm not interested in rewriting half the book. I'd rather buy something that I can use almost straight out of the box. Overall, the book it worth having because of the ideas in it, but the publication values are so lackluster that I think poorly of those who published it -it’s not of professional quality.

School of Evocation

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School of Evocation

Author: Various
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
Publish Date: 2003
ISBN: 1-58994-113-6
Pages: 61
Rating: 5 out of 10
Retail Price: $14.95

On a whim, I picked up a copy of School of Evocation while at a gaming convention. The title and cover didn’t really grab me, but the book was basically free with the purchase of another book that did grab me. After a few months, I noticed it on the shelf and decided to read it.

The book begins with a new class, the dedicated evoker. My guess is that this class is supposed to replace the evoker specialist wizard with something a bit less similar to other wizards. I think this is a noble goal, though I’m not sure I like the direction this particular class took with it. For starters, the class has an alignment restriction of “any non-good,” with the justification being that because evocation spells tend to cause a lot of damage, a good alignment doesn’t fit... a view I roll my eyes at. The class is basically a mobile artillery platform. They trade the ability to cast spells from any school except for evocation and universal for a few custom abilities, such as being able to lose a prepared spell for another like the cleric does and the ability to power through spell resistance. The idea for this class wasn’t bad, but the way it was written was, simply put, blasé.

Next the book moved on to eight prestige classes, one for each of the sub-schools of evocation. None of these classes was especially bad, but they were extremely predictable. The prestige class that focuses on cold gets cold resistance, the one that focuses on acid gets an acid-based attack, etc. It just didn’t seem like there was a lot of thought put into these classes aside from making sure there was one for each sub-school.

Interestingly, there were only five new feats in this book, as opposed to the usual trend where as many feats as the printers can handle are tossed in. None of these feats appealed to me personally, but didn’t appear to be over or underpowered. After the feats came and spells. As I expected, the vast majority of the spells (17 of the book’s 61 pages) were just new variations on energy damage. A few, however, were actually very well-conceived and fit the image of a “magical destroyer” type of caster very well.

The last section of the book dealt with new items, magical, mundane and alchemical. A new and interesting concept was introduced in this section. By using certain alchemical items as expendable focuses from spells, one can increase some aspect of certain spells. For example, if using chill crystals (a new alchemical item) when casting a spell with the [Cold] descriptor, one’s caster level is treat as though it were 1 higher than it is. Not a bad idea, I think, though it might be deserving of a whole chapter of its own, since there were very few such alchemical items given. The magical items listed were actually fairly nice as well. Instead of a bunch of high-damage spell effects like I expected, there were many items that took some creative thought by the designer, such as an acid-based key that melts and fuses a lock once inserted.

I didn’t see a lot of obvious errors in this book, as I do with so many others. Errors were not this book’s problem. The problem was that a large part of the material from this book just didn’t seem overly creative. Still, someone looking for alternatives to the spells and magic items in the Player’s Handbook should be able to find something worth the effort in this book.

Path of the Sword

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Path of the Sword

Author: Various
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
Publish Date: 2002
ISBN: 1-58994-061-X
Pages: 172
Rating: 7 out of 10
Retail Price: $24.95

I picked up Path of the Sword in a large lot of books sold cheaply at a convention several years ago. It’s been sitting unread on my shelf for quite a while. I’m not sure why I hesitated to read it, especially since it’s from the same company that gave us Traps and Treachery. This volume focuses specifically on the warrior classes (barbarians, fighters, monks and rangers). However, I recently grabbed it off the shelf randomly and began reading. I’m glad I did.

The book begins with a large chapter on classes. At the opening paragraph to this book, I actually groaned aloud. “This chapter contains more than 20 new classes...” I figured it was just a bunch of new prestige classes, most of which would be worth nothing to me. I was pleasantly surprised, however, to find out that this was not the case. There were only twelve prestige classes. The rest were core variants and a new type of class called the Legendary Class.

The prestige classes were on par with most other books. For the most part, they weren’t great, but weren’t badly-designed either. What was striking, however, was that each class was followed by a sample organization tied to the prestige class in some way. This includes suggestions for including the player characters, either as members of the organization or as opponents. I thought this was a wonderful addition to the book, and made some of the classes that didn’t catch my eye at first seem worth looking at again.

Several variant versions of the core warrior classes were offered as well. Surprisingly, the majority of these were fairly well-conceived, and would fit right into a game next to the class they were based on. For example, there’s the commander, which is based off of the fighter. The commander progresses like the fighter, save that he has poor Fortitude saves and good Will saves. He gains less bonus feats than the fighter, but has the ability to command allies around him, granting them bonuses to attack, armor class and the like based on the commander’s level. This class would be a fine addition to the fighter class, not a replacement.

Lastly, there were the legendary classes. These are special classes that work something like prestige classes. In fact, they’re a lot like the archmage prestige class from Dungeon Master’s Guide, in that at every level during a 5-level progression, you get to choose any ability from a list of abilities. These abilities can be fairly powerful, but the prerequisites to get into the class in the first place are extremely difficult to meet. The idea behind the legendary classes is to create a class progression for someone powerful enough that they may be the only representative of that particular class in the world.

Chapter 2 focuses on feats. Nothing looked bad, but there wasn’t a lot that was particularly inspired. A new type of feat, the [Rage] feat, was introduced. Unlike the [Divine] feats, which allow the user to trade one of his daily turn undead attempts for the day for the benefits of the feat, the [Rage] feats allow the user to use the benefits of the feat while raging. For example, the Warcry feat allows the user to spend an action to scream out a war cry, which effectively makes multiple opponents shaken if they fail a Will save.

A secondary section of this chapter dealt with new combat maneuvers, specifically, it touched on mounted combat and acrobatic combat (like the sort of thing you’d see in a John Woo movie). This is a good idea in general, I think, since the list of potential combat maneuvers from Player’s Handbook is somewhat small. However, most of what was listed here is the sort of thing the average DM would probably just allow a skill check for.

Chapter 3 was about the act of combat itself. A few of the opening pages touched on the benefits of specific feat combinations, but the meat of this chapter focused on special fighting schools. The idea behind a fighting school is that you can spend time, money and XP to progress along a particular school’s ability list until you’ve mastered 10 new techniques. I don’t have a problem with this idea, but I do think that most of the schools offered would have done better to have a progression path of 5 techniques instead of 10. Additionally, some of these techniques need to be toned down a little. For example, one school’s 7th progression is called “vorpal hack” and it allows you to declare you’re making an attack against a limb. You take a -4 penalty to your attack roll, but if the attack is successful, the creature simply loses that limb in lieu of taking damage. I don’t think not taking damage is a big deal when the limb you’ve just lost is your head.

The final chapter is everything else you’d expect in a book about warrior classes. New armor, weapons and equipment are touched on, though none of that looked especially great. A few methods for using one’s combat skills during fair and tournament games was detailed, including jousts, archery contests and the like. A few new mounts were given stats, such as the zebra, pegasus and sandskipper, and some new equipment for these mounts was also detailed. The bulk of this chapter, though, was dedicated to something called “organizational templates.”

Organizational template is a bit of a misnomer. It’s not actually a template at all. Instead, it’s an organization, such as a guild, which the PCs can potentially join. The benefit of this is that there are several levels of membership in an organization, so it gives the PCs another goal path besides their level advancement. I really thought the organizations that were offered were worth reading, and it’s given me quite a bit of inspiration for creating my own such organizations.

I’m glad I read this book. I only wish I’d done so sooner. It was far from perfect, but was much better than I thought it would be. It will require the reader to make a few changes to bring the material in line with the 3.5 revision, but I think that effort would be well worth it.

Path of Shadow

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Path of Shadow

Author: Various
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
Publish Date: 2002
ISBN: 1-58994-074-1
Pages: 172
Rating: 6 out of 10
Retail Price: $24.95

I thought that Path of the Sword was a surprisingly good book, so when I was finished with it, I picked up my copy of Path of Shadow and began reading it. Ostensibly, Path of Shadow is a sourcebook that focuses on rogues, though there was a good bit inside that seemed geared specifically towards the bard, monk and ranger classes as well. A good bit of the material built upon the death attack ability, meaning that it’s geared towards those with levels in the assassin prestige class.

In Path of the Sword, the first chapter focused on new classes, including variant core classes and legendary classes, which are a new type of class that works much like a prestige class, but are meant to represent someone who is one of only a tiny handful of people with the kind of power offered by this class. Path of Shadow, on the other hand, is geared so much towards classes that three of the five chapters in the book are dedicated to classes.

The first chapter focuses on prestige classes. Like Path of the Sword, this book has a great setup for presenting its prestige classes. It gives you the basics of the class and the class mechanics, and then it details an example organization built around this prestige class so you can see it in action. However, I found myself somewhat let down by the prestige classes presented in this book. Most weren’t bad, but there was little truly inspired work. Many of the prestige classes had mechanics that didn’t match their descriptions very well, such as the Falconer class, which had no mechanics relating to using birds of prey except that Handle Animal was on the skill list. More than one was designed in such a way that it would be exceptionally difficult for the average PC to continue adventuring if he or she was a member, such as the Noble Decoy, which is exactly what it sounds like&an individual that looks just like a member of the nobility or royalty and is used in public appearances where the noble’s life might be in danger.

Chapter 2 detailed several new legendary classes. This chapter was better than the first chapter. I found the Fortune’s Fool legendary class extremely enjoyable to read. However, this chapter was not without problems of its own. The biggest problem for me was that several of the legendary classes had prerequisites that assume way too much about an individual DM’s setting. Each legendary class requires the completion of at least one legendary quest, which is part of what makes it so difficult to become a member of this class. However, quests like “survive the barbs of the venomous grey dragon” or “venture into the land of the dead and drink from the river that is death and silence,” assume things that may not even exist in the world the PC is from. I don’t have a grey dragon in any of my rulebooks.

The third chapter was short and contained only a few classes. One of these classes was based in psionics, which I salute the author for. However, since psionics got a huge overhaul in the 3.5 update, this class would need to be completely redesigned from the ground up to be useful. The other classes were alright, but they were extremely narrowly focused. The delver, for example, gains bonuses against traps almost to the exclusion of all other rogue abilities, while the chameleon gains bonuses to disguising himself. I didn’t find anything in this chapter that’s going to make it to my gaming table.

The fourth chapter had to do with a rogue’s tools, which apparently includes skills, feats, magic items and the like. Perhaps more than any other class, the rogue depends on tools to get his job done. A fighter might need armor, but he takes no penalties for not having it, while a rogue takes penalties for not having a set of thieves tools on-hand. Most of the mundane equipment in this chapter (there wasn’t much) was actually pretty nice, like lock powder, which is a powder lubricant used to help grease locks and hinges. The magical equipment was alright, too. I think my favorite was lookout strips, which are strips of paper that thieves place in windows or doorways and if the window or doorway is opened, it sends the thief a mental ping via the alarm spell. The new uses for existing skills were alright, except for the Disguise skill, which basically allows you to pretty yourself up instead of disguising yourself. I was a bit disappointed, though, in the small number of such skills. The rogue class’s strength is in its skill points and skill selection, and I was hoping for more. The feats were extremely average (which is to say, below par), and I wouldn’t use any of them.

The final chapter dealt with schools and organizations. These are much like what was found in Path of the Sword, but geared towards the sneaky and stealthy. I had the same problem with the schools in this book as I did with those in Path of the Sword& I think the progressions should probably only be 5 steps instead of 10, and some were just too powerful, such as the step “sell the moon,” which allows a rogue to make a bluff check and if it’s successful, he can convince a person of something so deeply that nothing in the universe can persuade him it’s not true. The organizations weren’t bad, but were lacking in real design. Most were simply a series of +1 progressions. For example, the Assassin’s Guild gives you access to the guildhall at 1st level and ultimate authority over the guild at 6th level. The levels in between simply give you a +1 bonus to saves vs. poison. Blah.

Compared to Path of the Sword, I think that Path of Shadow fell short of the mark. It’s not a useless book, but I just had a much higher expectation for it than it could meet. If you’re willing to update the material to 3.5 rules, there are a few items of worth in this book, but it’s certainly not as useful as its predecessor.

Elemental Lore

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Elemental Lore

Author: Various
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games
Publish Date: 2003
ISBN: 1-58994-169-1
Pages: 62
Rating: 7 out of 10
Retail Price: $14.95

As monster books go, this one was not bad. It focuses almost entirely on elementals and creatures with an elemental subtype...and does a fairly good job of it. The monsters contained within all seem to be nicely balanced with their CR and I don't recall seeing any obvious blunders concerning over or underpowered creatures.

Several unique ideas were utilized in this text, such as the Gate Snake, a rare magical beats that can be captured and turned into living portals to the elemental planes. Or the Plague Wind, a malicious air elemental that breezes by, carrying disease and death in its winds.

While I creatinly won't claim that I'd use every monster in this book in my own game, I'd definately consider using a good deal of them. I think many, such as the Mercure or Earthen Maw will eventually end up as unique baddies or possibly guardians of powerful places or artifacts in my game. Some, such as the Telkhine, an elemental race of displaced spirits, might even make up the basis for an entire incursion campaign. I'd definately recommend this book to anyone who is considering a storyline concerning elemental creatures.

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