[WotD] Chapter One OOC

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Cronono
Cronono's picture

Rolling rolling rolling.

Random
I rolled 1d20, the result is 4 = 4.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 4 = 4.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 1 = 1.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 8 = 8.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 13 = 13.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 5 = 5.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 7 = 7.
I rolled 1d20, the result is 15 = 15.
Cronono
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Rawhide!

Keep them doggie's rollin
I rolled 1d100, the result is 89 = 89.
Cronono
Cronono's picture

Appropriate skills usable now include perception, various knowledge rolls, and survival.

If you intend to investigate, stealth and investigation are clearly helpful.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Will roll a general Perception to see what can be determined from here. Based on that roll, I'll most likely make Stealth & Investigation rolls following.

Perception
I rolled 1d20+6, the result is 14, 6 = 20.
Cronono
Cronono's picture

The sitting figure is an elf. You can't quite figure out what kind, but he's sitting at the fire and whistling while fidgeting with something in his hands or lap.

The standing figures aren't right. You'd guess human, but humans don't stand perfectly still for so long.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

With the knowledge that the sitting figure likely has the same Keen Senses and ability to see in the dark as Eryndir, he'll attempt to Stealth his way to a vantage point to investigate. He'll silently gesture to the rest of the party that he's going to break off and in what direction. With a flat hand, he gestures to the point he's chosen. (Will RP appropriately on the IC thread, pending the success/failures of the rolls.)

Stealth first; investigation second.
I rolled 1d20+7, the result is 11, 7 = 18.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 2, 2 = 4.
Cronono
Cronono's picture

Eryndir is a ninja. He's not a very good investigator, but he's a ninja.

Those standing figures? They have horrific injuries. Eryndir's stealth roll is sufficient to stop himself from audibly gagging. That said, the standing figures are some sort of scarecrow made out of people instead of straw.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Is that one roll enough to make it back to the tree, as well? Or will that require a separate roll?

Cronono
Cronono's picture

That's fine - he gets out, sucks at scouting, and gets back.

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Caleb will roll Perception, Medicine and Religion; the last two based on testimony from our scout.

Perception, Medicine, Religion
I rolled 1d20+3, the result is 13, 3 = 16.
I rolled 1d20+5, the result is 13, 5 = 18.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 16, 2 = 18.

"Men are the only animals that devote themselves, day in and day out, to making one another unhappy. It is an art like any other. Its virtuosi are called altruists." - H.L. Mencken

Cronono
Cronono's picture

They are zombies. The nature of the wounds suggests they were killed by someone using slashing weapons. More likely than not they were killed in battle, based on the irregular wound pattern. The strikes were meant to be mortal, but Caleb has seen finer handiwork.

The figure in the middle is most likely a necromancer controlling the zombies. Free zombies look for food until they get it, then they eat it and look for food. Controlled zombies don't do anything until instructed. These zombies are standing still, so likely controlled.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Three questions:

1. Don't want to assume anything about individual versus group knowledge - has Caleb passed on his discovery about the zombies?

2. How far are we from the campfire at the moment? What's the distance?

3. From my initial perception roll (since my investigation was terrible), is it possible to determine whether either the zombies or the elf are dressed in a particular way? Are any of them wearing Outpost/Irregular colors or insignia? Are they dressed like the communists from earlier in the day?

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Nope, Caleb didn't say anything about zombies. His preference would be for the party to leave and then, when we return, not find any sign of them; it's been a long day.

"Men are the only animals that devote themselves, day in and day out, to making one another unhappy. It is an art like any other. Its virtuosi are called altruists." - H.L. Mencken

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Question 2 - 50 yards, or 30 squares. At night, with a campfire, that makes it easier to see them and harder to see you. Unless they don't use light to see.

Question 3 - They're dressed oddly. They don't have clothing that is in the same style you're familiar with, and they don't have any notable insignia. The elf is wearing simple brown robes with white accents around the collar, sleeves, and the hem.

Cronono
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I don't think the fact that there are zombies was communicated. Do you want to reword the IC?

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Edited. The fact that they're sitting unnaturally still is certainly enough to clue in that it's 'not right'.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Just want to make sure I understand who constitutes the ten bodies:

1. Able
2. Caleb
3. Charn
4. Raven
5. Eryndir
6 & 7. Orien & Garesh
8. Dyrakus
9. Hollinger
10. Dwarven tax collector, deceased mother of Orien & Garesh...

Yes?

Cronono
Cronono's picture

That's right.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

There isn't much to do before dawn, five and a half hours from now. Let me know if you intend to do anything besides enjoy the pleasures of sleep.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

I'd like to give the others a bit more time to chime in OOC'ly on my last IC post. Barring any objections, Eryndir would sell the loot (minus the rations, sealed bag, and sealed letter [obvs]), and deliver Raven & the children's shares to them personally.

(Mainly because he is also going to give Narad's dagger to Orien, as well.)

Trigger
Trigger's picture

In selling the loot, this was my calculation:

4 handaxes - 5gp each = 20gp/2 = 10gp
2 greatclubs - 2sp each = 4sp/2 = 2sp
2 longswords - 15gp each = 30gp/2 = 15 gp
3 backpacks - 2gp each = 6gp/2 = 3gp

= 28gp, 2 sp. Plus 1 gp, 2sp, 7 cp that we took from them directly. Divide by four (Raven, two kids, and Caleb - Charn, Eryndir, and Able have forsworn their shares for this particular loot.) That's 7gp, 1 sp, and 1 cp per share, with 1gp, 3cp left over. With the remainder, he'll pick up a "comfortable" breakfast for four, to start the next day well.

Please let me know if any of this doesn't work. If it does, I'll post to the IC forum. If there are any objections from anyone (players or DM), say the word and I'll adjust.

I assume we're sharing some kind of quarters in a barracks set up, but if I'm wrong, please let me know.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Looks like Caleb also gave up his share. Raven, however, does not.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Okay, so 28 gp, 4 sp, 7 cp divided by 3 = 8 gp, 1 sp, 1 cp per share, with 4 gp, 1 sp, 4 cp left over.

Eryndir would then slip the extra 1 sp in Orien's share and bring back the extra 4 gp and 4 cp to the group, rather than spending it on food.

Sound good?

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Do it to it.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Okay, last question, then - are Raven and/or Orien awake when Eryndir stops by to drop off their shares?

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Orien is. Raven is not.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Searching the bag reveals the following:

2 potions of healing
1 scroll of Revivify
1 scroll of Silent Image
4 canteens containing an unpalatable but strong liquor
1 tambourine
1 pan flute

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Regarding the split, you should treat all characters as having a share (ie, Able & yourself, etc) with the kids getting 4 shares and everyone else getting one. Of course, it doesn't affect me since I offered my share to the children, but giving Raven more wasn't my intention.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

This is a skill challenge. Feel free to pick a skill and roll it. If you want to know the difficulty before you roll, I'll describe it as Easy, Medium, or Hard.

You can help someone else only once during the course of the skill challenge.

All PCs must roll before any PC can make their second roll. Same is true for subsequent rounds, if any.

You guys can stop the skill challenge at any point. The more successes you accrue, the more benefits you'll receive.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

I don't understand.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

A skill challenge involves using your PC's skills in order to overcome some sort of problem. Much like a combat, the PCs take turns rolling to accrue successes (or failures!) to solve the problem.

The way this works, you say "I'd like to interact with the problem with my X skill. I intend to do such and such a thing, which seems like the X skill to me." I then tell you if that's going to be easy, medium, or hard. Based on my response, you know the DC is going to be low, average, or high. You can decide not to roll at that point.

Skill challenges usually end when the party accrues a specified number of successes or failures. If you get to the specified number of successes first, you overcome the problem and usually get good rewards. If you get to the specified number of failures first, bad things happen. Sometimes there is a spectrum of rewards and punishments, sometimes there isn't.

In this case, the party is standing guard duty with three different groups of extraplanar visitors to The Outpost. You can use your skills to determine what to do with these folks and progress the skill challenge. For example, you could use your Persuasion skill to chat somebody up, or you could use a Knowledge Religion skill to learn more about the religion iconography of the travelers. Alternately, you can come up with something super creative. I tend to reward creative and reasonable applications of skills to skill challenges with easier than expected DCs.

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

I think Caleb will start with Insight to try and get a general sense of what these people are like or if they seem nervous or anxious about anything.

Insight
I rolled 1d20+5, the result is 13, 5 = 18.

"Men are the only animals that devote themselves, day in and day out, to making one another unhappy. It is an art like any other. Its virtuosi are called altruists." - H.L. Mencken

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Insight is easy, medium, or hard, depending on who Caleb is targeting. You can keep your 18 - but who is Caleb observing?

Trigger
Trigger's picture

I understand now. Here are my thoughts, in order of preference (based on how good I am at each skill):

1. Stealth: Being a sneaky ninja, Eryndir would like to use the distraction of the actions of his compatriots to sneak in and around the ranks of the travelers and see if he can either overhear conversations that detail their intentions, or observe anything about their behavior, clothing, items, demeanor, etc.

2. Perception: Just being an observant fellow, Eryndir would like to sit back and watch his compatriots interact with the travelers and see what he can passively discern by watching.

3. Sleight of Hand: While the others are interacting with the travelers, Eryndir would like to see what he can secret off of their carts to see if he can see anything hidden beneath the surface.

4. Persuation/Deception: Specifically with regard to the human and halfling, since Eryndir recognizes them, he would like to engage them in conversation with a combination of Persuasion and Deception. Persuasion to convince them to open up to him, Deception to convince them he'd be willing to "help them out" if they're truthful with him. (My Persuasion and Deception modifiers are the same, so I didn't know if I could use a combination, since it's the same roll for both.)

I know I can't do them all, but I'd love to see what the DC for each is before deciding.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

For the first three proposed skills, the difficulty will depend on which group he's targetting - the bugs, the demons, or the wine cart.

For the fourth set of proposed skills, Eryndir doesn't necessarily know the individuals. Instead, he knows the style of their clothing - it is exactly the same robe style that he saw the night before. That said, Persuasion would be easy. Is it actually Deception to say that Eryndir would "help them out" if they're truthful?

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

I think Caleb will focus on the average dang ol' travelers with the wine. He doesn't have enough experience dealing with aliens or any of that other shit to be able to tell if they're trustworthy.

"Men are the only animals that devote themselves, day in and day out, to making one another unhappy. It is an art like any other. Its virtuosi are called altruists." - H.L. Mencken

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Caleb's insight roll is easy. His 18 is a success.

The men on the wine cart are extremely excited. They're not nervous or apprehensive, but they're smiling very hard, they're really happy, and Caleb gets the impression that they are coming to The Outpost rather than running away from something. This isn't just a job for the two men, this is fun and emotionally fulfilling. They appear not at all inconvenienced by the delay caused by the two gambling dwarves.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

First, I'll note that Helping seems immensely important to me. Advantage could mean the difference between success or failure. For the first round, Eryndir will Help one of his compatriots. (Will determine which once everyone's chimed in to see the DC levels they're going with.)

Second, I have to assume that Eryndir is being deceitful when he says he'll "help out" the human and halfling. If they say "we're just looking to sell our perfectly normal wares," and it's believable, then he'll totally speed them along. If they say "we'll slip you a gold if you let us by with our contraband," he will quarantine them so fast... Without knowing how they'll answer, I assumed Deception would be appropriate.

Third, probably best if Eryndir focuses his efforts on the human and halfling. He's not familiar with either the insectoid race or the demonic folks. So, he has less of an idea as to whether he'll be able to succeed. Humans and halflings are more familiar beings, and the familiarity of their garb gives him a level of comfort in dealing with them.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Helping is totally awesome. That's why you can only do it once during the whole challenge, rather than doing it every round. I'll leave it to you to determine if helping is better when your companion is very likely or very unlikely to succeed.

The rest of your post makes sense to me. What skill are you rolling and against whom? I'll give you a difficulty after you declare. You can change after I give you the difficulty if you'd like.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

For the first round, while Caleb is using Insight on the human and halfling, Eryndir would like to stealth around to the other side of them and see if he can pick anything up while approaching quietly.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

Stealthing around the wagon is a medium difficulty roll.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Hrm. My only concern is that if I do not succeed, it could make Persuading/Deceiving them harder later on. Let me see if I can think of something more creative that will convince our DM, in his infinite wisdom, to reward my creativity with an easier DC.

Dafyd
Dafyd's picture

Wishing to move along in an orderly fashion, Charn sizes up the insectoid folk.

Rolling a History and a Perception check. Then he'll probably make a recommendation to our Persuasive people.

I rolled 1d20+3, the result is 7, 3 = 10.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 13, 2 = 15.
Trigger
Trigger's picture

How about a base Perception on the human and halfling? Maybe Eryndir just needs to pause and size them up to determine the best way to approach?

Cronono
Cronono's picture

That could work. It would be easy.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

So, Charn only makes a history roll against the insect folk. You can't make two different rolls in a single round in the skill challenge. That said, making a history roll against the insect folk is super easy - these insect folk are certainly not from around here.

In my opinion, that doesn't help move the needle on the challenge. I don't want to give a success for something obvious, and I don't want to give a failure for not moving the needle. Charn can pick a different action.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Rolling Perception on the human and hafling.

Eryndir, at this stage in his journey, is learning to be more patient. To consider his actions before acting, and to observe any factors he might be able to use to his advantage, or obstacles he might need to overcome.

To that end, he takes a long moment to watch the human and halfling. He watches their demeanor, the way they interact with one another. Are they frustrated by the wait, or is that a drop of nervous sweat on their brow? Are their robes properly fitted to them, or were they taken off other travelers to disguise themselves? Do their barrels seem the appropriate type for carrying wine, or is there some trick among their wares?

Perception
I rolled 1d20+6, the result is 20, 6 = 26.
Cronono
Cronono's picture

Eryndir notices that the barrels for the "best wine" are not very secure, as if they were recently closed by someone who doesn't seal barrels very often. The barrels for the good and great wines appear to be professionally sealed.

Two successes.

Trigger
Trigger's picture

Able and Charn still have to finish Round 1, but in thinking about Round 2, do we know between Caleb and Eryndir who is more Charismatic? (Since we seem to be tag teaming the wine sellers.)

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Caleb definitely thinks he's more charismatic.

"Men are the only animals that devote themselves, day in and day out, to making one another unhappy. It is an art like any other. Its virtuosi are called altruists." - H.L. Mencken

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