New PC build advice

7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Darker
New PC build advice

So my PC suddenly died -- the motherboard shorted and after troubleshooting every component, it seems that nothing can be done other than replacing the motherboard. Unfortunately, its an LGA 1155 and that socket is all but obsolete and the ram is all 240 pin. Replacing just the board seems pretty difficult without buying something old and used and finding a board that will actually let me use all my components has proven just about impossible. The few I've found are $200-300 because of the second-hand market for obsolete replacement parts.

So I decided that the only thing that really makes sense is to upgrade. Anyone been keeping up with the newest stuff? I'm looking at a i7-7700k or i5-7600 and maybe an Z270 board, but I haven't looked at that stuff in a while. Anyone done any recent upgrades that could help me see what's good on the landscape?

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

If you're close enough to Atlanta area, you might want to check out Fry's Electronics for shopping. Sure, you can buy everything online, but there's something cool about putting all the parts for your computer in a cart like you're in a grocery store. There was one of these by me where I grew up and I will admit to being somewhat disappointed when I last visited - but at that point I didn't even have anything in mind (it had been a LONG TIME since I built my own computer).

Here's a 'budget computer guide' with $800 to spend and doesn't include monitor and peripherals - basically the stuff you're most likely to need.

If you're set on the i5-7600, the best gaming PC looks good, and with a larger budget, you'll be better prepared for the future for a long time.

I definitely recommend you get a SSD if you're replacing the Hard Drive. It's also not hard to add external storage. I bought at 2TB external drive from Costco for ~$75.00.

Since it's been so long since I've built a computer, I wouldn't consider myself up to speed, but I think both guides I've linked to are worth a read. They talk about why they made their decision and what they would have done differently with a little more money to spend. I miss 'Sharkey Extreme', but this will do; it will do.

Good luck!

Darker

Good advice. I'm actually running a fairly large SSD for my OS and a few games, but just discovered the M.2 drives and the U.2 drives. Not sure if I'll just keep my old SSD or try to upgrade. I've got a fairly decent GTX 1060 GPU, so it helps out pretty well there.

I'll check out Fry's... I'm in Atlanta once every month or two. Tiger Direct has a store up there as well just North of Atlanta that I might check out.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I just did a replacement from an old LGA 1155 motherboard, opting for as much reuse of existing components as I could manage. Didn't really want to spend a pile of money on the whole thing, so I went with an ASRock Z97 with LGA 1150 socket (which is still older tech, but much easier to get than the LGA 1155 socket). This necessitated a new CPU, which ended up being the Haswell i5-4670k, but all my other components worked fine with it, and it supports the M.2 drive interface (although only one). I upgraded my GPU, as well, but that was something I'd have been doing soon anyway because I was running a GTX 560, which only had 1 GB of memory on it and was starting to bog down under the demands of newer games.

Have been very pleased with the resulting system. The CPU seems more than adequate; I have had no issues with heat buildup, and there have been no slowdowns in system operation under heavy load. The ASRock motherboard booted on the first try after I got everything installed. No need to fiddle with the stock BIOS or any of that nonsense. I'm running Win 7 on this system, in an effort to outlast Win 10 in the somewhat vain hope that Win 11 will not be a privacy nightmare (or that Steam will get the majority of my games back-ported to Linux).

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Fry's doea offer online price matching, so it's eorth doing your honework. And of course, you get to load up a shopping cart and walk out with every component instead of waiting for shipping.

Darker

Talanall wrote:

I just did a replacement from an old LGA 1155 motherboard, opting for as much reuse of existing components as I could manage. Didn't really want to spend a pile of money on the whole thing, so I went with an ASRock Z97 with LGA 1150 socket (which is still older tech, but much easier to get than the LGA 1155 socket). This necessitated a new CPU, which ended up being the Haswell i5-4670k, but all my other components worked fine with it, and it supports the M.2 drive interface (although only one). I upgraded my GPU, as well, but that was something I'd have been doing soon anyway because I was running a GTX 560, which only had 1 GB of memory on it and was starting to bog down under the demands of newer games.

Well, this gives me too much to think about. Replacing just the board and the processor looks like it'll run me about $450 but socket 1150 processors that would replace my upper-end i5 are getting to be in the rare category. The 1150 board lets me keep my 32G of really nice 240 pin RAM I have, which is nice... but then I'm basically only spending $100 less than replacing the board and processor with top of the line stuff. The i5-4460 Haswell I'm looking at for the 1150 socket is only about $50 cheaper than the brand new i7-7700k right now... I'm wondering if it'll be easier to find a buyer for my two Ballistix 16 G kits and replace the RAM with 16G of something decent to get it working again with the 1151 stuff.

But now there's the 1150 left to think about.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I ended up going with the board/processor replacement because I don't really want to run Windows 8 or 10, and I also don't really want to spend the time on research to make sure that I can run Win 7 on the latest hardware. I came close to buying an enterprise license of Win 8, buying top-of-the-line components, and trying to make the resulting system last through at least one more upgrade cycle of Windows, in hopes that that Win 11 or 12 will have an option that doesn't send who-knows-what telemetry back to Microsoft.

But in all honesty, I decided not to because the only thing I do that requires Windows is gaming, and if push comes to shove I am prepared to limit myself to titles that Steam offers for Linux.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold