Early Modern d20 RPG or Gunpowder & Dragons

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Tom Kalbfus
Early Modern d20 RPG or Gunpowder & Dragons

This campaign shares many features with Dungeons & Dragons, there are lots of monsters, plenty of magic, the Core Character Classes of Dungeons & Dragons are all there, the ranged weapons are a bit more advanced that the standard ranged weapons of Dungeons & Dragons, because this is the age of gunpowder, it is also the age of exploration, and the age of piracy.

If you ever seen a Pirates of the Caribbean movie that would fit right into this setting Early Modern characters share some features with Dungeons & Dragons and some features of D20 Modern. We use the Defense rules of D20 modern, armor is only half as effective against gunpowder weapons as it is against other armor types. Characters develop combat reflexes which serve as a natural defense bonus increasing with level at about half the rate of the character's Basic Attack Bonus, thus if a character has a BAB of +2, his Defense Adjustment will be +1 before he puts on any armor or takes his dexterity adjustment into account. A 1st level Fighter for example will have a BAB of +1, and a Basic Defense Adjustment BDA of +0. Fractional amounts are rounded down. Let's just call the Defense Score in D20 modern AC to avoid confusion.

On the character Sheet there will be the AC score, the Touch score which is Armor class minus the Armor Rating AR of the Armor worn, the Flat-footed score which is Armor Class minus the Dexterity Adjustment, and the Gunpowder Score which is the Armor Class minus half the Armor rating of the Armor worn rounded down. Aside from this little mechanic everything is the same as in the Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 Core rules.

Ships are more advanced, they cross oceans, have better navigation, and typically come armed with cannons, there is the Old World and the New World. Socially the Old World is set up much like the standard Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting, the melee weapons are much the same, gunpowder weapons have replaced crossbows shortbows and longbows, one thing gunpowder weapons aren't is quite, if you want to do a sneak attack, bows still have their uses. Firing a musket pretty much alerts everybody in the enemy camp that they are under attack. For a dungeon setting, it is useful to use melee weapons, or bows as the walls of the dungeon will muffle the sound a bit, but fire that musket and everyone in the dungeon will pretty much be onto you.

Magic works the same, money and treasure are the same as well. What do you think. Is there anything to add about this?

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Hi Tom! Welcome to the site!

I love swashbuckling in my D&D and I definitely want to encourage you to incorporate it into your games.

In D&D terms, the major disadvantage to firearms is their rate of fire. At high levels, characters that rely on attacks need full attacks to make a dent against high level monsters. A 3.5 Balor has 330 hit points. Even if a musket is doing 2d12 points of damage (significantly more than standard weapons), if you can only fire your weapon every 3rd round and you have four characters fighting, you are looking at ~20 rounds of combat. That's just too long!

A big part of swashbuckling is moving and attacking. I'd really encourage you to think about allowing a character to move and attack; and I'd really like to encourage you to rethink the 'full attack action' in a more beneficial way - either allowing characters to attack multiple times after moving or adding damage dice (like sneak attack) so higher level characters can still deal with higher level foes.

Regarding defenses against firearms, we know that armor generally disappeared when firearms became the primary form of attack because it ultimately wasn't very effective. But the Spanish Consquistadors still wore relatively heavy armor! If you're fighting opponents that don't have firearms regularly, you'll still probably want armor. Players will choose to have armor for melee fights even if it isn't QUITE as effective against firearms. I think it's important to consider how armor works in both situations.

The way you've suggested using some of the armor value for a defense against firearms isn't going to be too difficult in play, but it is a little difficult to explain. For that reason, it might be simply easier to explain that a firearm is resolved as a touch attack. Alternatively, you could use the 'armor as DR' optional rule. If firearms have higher damage values, armor is less effective against them compared to other weapons... If I recall correctly, the suggested variant divides the armor value in half; half is applied to your AC, the other half is provided as DR. Depending on how you address the 'full attack' DR is less valuable against one big hit and more valuable against several small hits. The way you choose to address full attacks will help determine whether to use DR and/or what values to use. In any case, you can also give firearms a DR penetration value - pistols might have smaller values than muskets, but it might be another way to make armor a less optimal strategy.

Regarding the choice of whether to fire a musket or not, it's not JUST the PCs who make that decision. If the party ambushes a group of pirates, one of the pirates could fire his weapon and warn everyone. Since weapons might sometimes fire accidentally, or someone might be shooting at a rat, it isn't clear that people ought to ALWAYS assume a shot is the result of an imminent attack. If you use a firearm as a DC 0 and apply the -1 for every 10 feet of distance, people WON'T hear it if they're a football field away. While that's not necessarily realistic, that'd be consistent with the base rules.

To give a swashbuckling feel, I suggest giving players more options in combat than standard 3.5. In the homebrew that my friends and I play, one of the first things we did is change how attacks of opportunity work with special attacks (like disarm). Under standard rules, you declare a disarm, your opponent gets a free attack-of-opportunity, and if they succeed, you automatically fail. Nobody attempts to disarm anyone if they don't have the appropriate feats. We changed it so that you attempt your disarm. If you fail, THEN your opponent gets an attack of opportunity. That really makes a difference in what players are willing to try.

Good luck!

Tom Kalbfus

A few other things, this level of technology has ocean crossing ships, this opens up aquatic adventures as well as interactions with pirates, there are aquatic races in the oceans and sea monsters as well as continents to discover and colonize. Then there is the question of what's in the New World, the possibilities include barbarians, lost civilizations, monsters, dragons. Treasures could include coins from lost and existing New World civilizations, they don't have to be exact replicas of pre-Columbian civilizations, this is still a fantasy world after all, the tech level could be anywhere from standard D&D all the way back to the stone age, and their might even be Lost World continents or islands inhabited by dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures. The New World inhabitants will have their own magic and magic items, they will have their own gods, and of course they will get their hands on gunpowder technology as well in the few decades following first contact. Barbarians will have their own muskets and powder horns, will hunt with them and fight wars with them with the colonizers and with other tribes.

If you seen the show Outlander, the societies shown would be much like that, except with monsters and magic added to the mix.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

It would be a good idea to make a GM map of the entire world, so you know where the coastlines are. On Earth, the Old World consists of Europe, Asia, and the north coast of Africa during the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The New World consists of North, Central, South America. Australia, Oceana, Subsaharan Africa, Madagascar, and Antarctica, so we would need to make similar places on the fantasy map of the World, the Early Modern Era is the first global era, when most of all of the civilizations of the world make contact with each other, and the first ships circumnavigate the World. Some of these lands are discovered yet by the PC's civilization but they need to be on the map so the PCs or someone else ca. Discover them.

Tom Kalbfus

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

One of my favorite campaigns (with my current group, many years ago) was built around the idea that the GM would rotate - we all took turns running adventures in the same world. We did some brainstorming for the big picture, and we were setting this in a fantasy new-world. With so much to discover, it didn't contradict any existing canon if we found something completely unexpected.

Big picture, our 'Fantasy Europe amalgam' had been subjugated by a powerful Rakshasa ruler. In relative recent history the Rakshasa had been defeated, which allowed people to leave fantasy Europe and kick off the age of exploration. Various flavors of Rakshasas were major enemies as they had established themselves in various aspects of the New World. While fantasy Europe was primarily humans (and all our PCs were to start), the new world was a mix of elves/goblins and we established that there was a relationship between them (corrupting influence or some such). I think I personally drew a little inspiration from Stargate SG-1; the Rakshasas were a little like the Go'ald (sp?) - interested in dominating and using people but not simply obliterating them. I think we presumed the Rakshasas had divided the world into separate domains - as a result what our characters were dealing with was separate from other regions of the world that we weren't engaging with at the time.

I wish I could find my notes!

Tom Kalbfus

Here are the ideas I am working on in my campaign. There are eight continents, one of them is the Sunken continent of Atlantis. The World map looks like than of Earth but with some modifications. There is a chain of islands going from north to south, starting with Iceland, through the Canary island and Bermuda, down through the South Atlantic following an under water mountain range called the Mid-Atlantic ridge, there are not enough islands to block the Gulf Stream current from warming Europe.

But there are more islands than in our world, the water is also shallower here, this is the sunken continent of Atlantis, the primary inhabitants of this continent are merfolk, followed by aquatic elves, and the humans living on the Atlantean Island chain which was once a mountain chain of this now sunken continent. The inhabitants of this area worship the Olympian dieties as found in the 3.5 edition book Deities & Demigods, towards the northern end of this island chain in the vicinity of Iceland, the Olympian gods are supplanted by the Norse Gods, as Viking colonization has taken place here. There is enough land area in the Atlantean Island chain to equal that of Greece, the islands are rugged and mountainous.

There are many city states on these islands resembling the cultures of Ancient Greece, they worship the Olympian gods have limited agriculture and rely heavily of fishing for sustainable, as much of the water over the sunken continent is quite shallow and productive fishing grounds for the human fisherman. In this same water is a kingdom of merfolk and there are smaller kingdoms of aquatic elves. The most recent interlopers are colonists from Europe who worship the god Mithras - a stand-in for Christianity in this fantasy world, they have brought in gunpowder technology and their advanced sailing ships, and the Atlantean inhabitants of these islands have done their best to keep up. There are many different kingdoms here, some are client states of Spain, Portugal, France, and England, these are modern world reference names I am using, I may change them a bit.

The primary inhabitants of France, by the way, are elves, other than being elves and living long lives, they are pretty much French in their mannerisms and culture in many respects. Britain, and Ireland are human domains. The Holy Roman Empire (Germany) is mostly human with some dwarven kingdoms in the mountain ranges. Italy is a bunch of mostly human city States, but there are a lot of races here and much trade, and so is quite cosmopolitan.

The Nordic countries are domains of Giants, this includes Normandy and Iceland. The Giants worship the Norse Gods, the evil ones oppose them and have their own giant deities. The Cloud Giants and Storm giants worship the Norse Gods, and the Fire, Stone, Frost, and Hill Giants worship other gods that are opposed to the Asgardian pantheon. The Cloud Giants are the most numerous of civilized giants, but their populations is relatively small, they stand about 15 to 20 feet tall as adults, there are a lot more humans living on their lands, but the giants are the nobility. Cloud Giants tend to live in castles scaled to their size.

South America is a Lost World inhabited by dinosaurs, and primitive peoples including Amazons. This continent is separated from Central America by a stretch of ocean connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific. Central America is inhabited by civilized people, barbarians, and now colonists from Europe. North America above Mexico is largely inhabited by barbarian tribes and some European colonists from France and England.

Tom Kalbfus

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Like the real world but bigger often runs into problems. It's hard to make hundreds or THOUSANDS of fantasy places feel distinct enough to justify the investment of time to make them. If your campaign is focused on a small area and these other things are the things that inform it, that can work - by analogy, your campaign is a cooking pot, and those are all ingredients in the kitchen - it's important you know what you have, but the players are only going to experience what makes it into the final dish.

While ocean voyages sound like they're going to be an important part of the campaign, having to go 'all over' can be a pain. If you're in Atlantic Greek island archipelago and you want to have dinosaur adventures, you have to go to a completely different section of the map.

I'd recommend keeping the conceit of the islands, but greatly reducing them in number. Within each cluster, islands have a very different character. For example, one of the Greek islands could be heavily volcanic with very little vegetation. There are a few goat herders and they tend to be considered 'uncivilized' and 'hostile'. It might be that this island includes Cyclops as a potential enemy. A nearby island is a metropolis - the powerful king has a labyrinth and is known for trying to kidnap inventors to enslave...

I do have to wonder if there's any advantage to setting the (not)Greek islands in the Atlantic instead of in the Mediterranean.

With every thing you're putting in the game, you should think about how players can interact with it. Are they going to get along with the Norman nobility, or are they going to start a violent rebellion? How are you going to handle that? What types of adventures do you think low-, medium- and high-level characters will complete? You can potentially use the same setting for multiple campaigns, changing focus to keep things from getting stale.

You could start with The Lost World style exploration of a high plateau that still has living dinosaurs and the ruins of ancient civilizations. But that probably won't have a lot of ship-based exploration. Another campaign could focus on island-hopping and dealing with complex changing political alliances as foreigners destabilize the regimes.

Keep in mind that technology, even advanced technology, isn't really different from magic. Showing up with firearms isn't any more advantageous than showing up with wands of fireball. The type of cultural domination we saw in the real world (which probably owed more to the introduction of disease than any technological superiority) probably wouldn't exist to the same degree in your fantasy world. I don't think players will enjoy 'Colonialism: The D&D Version', so avoiding those tropes are both justified and probably desirable.

Tom Kalbfus

The actual Greek islands became part of the Arcadian Empire, which is the fantasy equivalent of the Roman Empire, it was during the late Arcadian Empire that the Mithran religion was spread, and it ended up supplanting the Greek and Roman Gods that were the original dominant religion, and then the Arcadian Empire fell and broke up into a bunch of kingdoms, but the Mithran religion remained. Mithras is a Sun god and a warrior god, and there are a bunch of Mithran churches all over Europe except for France and Scandinavia. The French are elves and they worship an elven deity and speak Elvish. Relations between the English and the French have been fraught for some time with a number of wars being fought between the two nations in the recent past. A Clan of Norman Cloud Giants had conquered England about 600 years ago, the giants have since been driven out of England, but they remain in Normandy up to this day. The elves and the Cloud Giants share France, though the giants stick to Normandy for the most part.

The Atlantean Islands have been isolated for some time, there was some contact with the Vikings 600 years ago, but the Little Ice Age cut them off, and they were largely forgotten about but the Europeans until about 160 years ago, when an explorer looking for a westward route to Asia discovered the New World, contact was made with the Atlantean islands and the Merfolk as well. The Atlantean Islanders have muskets and cannon now, but they still worship the Greek gods and live in city states. The merfolk have no use for gunpowder weapons, they don't work under water, and you can't shoot anything that is underwater. A cannonball just makes a big splash when it hits the water and it sinks to the bottom.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I'm working on a map, it's a bit tedious doing it by hand. In a day or two I'll have a preliminary map of coastlines. It is almost Earth but not quite. The World name is Gaia, and the world is also a goddess that druids worship, she is about equal to Mythras, and is worshipped on all the continents.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I'll introduce the "Greek Solar System" that my campaign world is set in. There is a crystal sphere, within which all spelljamming rules apply, this crystal sphere is in an unusual place however, instead of the phystolin, it is set in the hard vacuum of the Traveller Universe, where I am using Traveller T20 rules, basically I modified the Traveller classes to be D&D 3.5 compliant, skills that were previously modified by Education are now modified by Intelligence. Social Standing remains but is only applicable to the Traveller society, specifically the Third Imperium set in the 1100s of the Imperium Calendar. The crystal sphere is located in an empty hex adjacent to the Regina Star system in the Spinward Marches, its location is unknown to Imperial authorities, but was discovered by a group of space pirates that accidentally misjudged inside the crystal sphere. The pirates initially thought they misjudged into the Terran System, that was what the star patterns on the inside of the crystal sphere told them, they tried to jump to the Prometheus System from there, as they knew that the Terran System was under military occupation by the Third Imperium and this was a place, as a group of space pirates, they did not want to be. The Jump Drive would not work within the crystal sphere.

The space pirates monitored the radio frequencies, there were no artificial signals, they were quite puzzled by this as Terra was supposed to be a heavily populated system with tens of billions of inhabitants, they took sensor readings of the system's planets, they were in the wrong places within their orbits. There were eight planets. Mercury looked a bit strange, it had a thick atmosphere and a perpetual cloud cover consisting of water droplets, Venus was the same. The readings indicated breathable habitable atmospheres on both planets with most of the Sun's radiation reflected back into space by those cloudtops.

The pirates examined what they thought was Terra, no radio dominated from the planet's surface, infrared readings indicated less waste heat than was expected from a population of over ten billion inhabitants. What they thought was Mars had a thick breathable atmosphere with clouds and one ocean in the northern hemisphere. The moved closer to the World they thought was Terra, there was a lack of large metropolitan regions on the planet's surface, they did spot some wood fires, some sailing ships on the planet's oceans, some small cities without electricity. Some large flying creatures were spotted in the air. No artificial satellites orbited the planet as they drew closer.

A ship was spotted in space it had it's own atmospheric envelope, and humans were spotted walking outside on its wooden deck, obviously using some kind of force field to hold in the air and employing gravity plating on its deck so the crewmates could walk around on its surface.

The pirates landed their corsair on the planet's surface. Their readings indicated, as the moved around the system that the stars the saw in the night sky were fake, they were fixed to the inner surface of a sphere 63 astronomical units in radius. The pirates did some further exploration. The crystal sphere was some giant artifact, the fake stars on the inside of the sphere were markers indicating exits to the outside of the sphere from which they could jump to neighboring star systems. An ancient alien artifact built by someone, they did not know who, since they were outlaws, they did not report their findings to the imperial authorities. After taking some measurements, they found that they could jump into the sphere but not out of it, they had to pass through one of the portals leading to they outside before they could jump, this place was a perfect pirate's hideout. The pirates found out that jumping into the sphere was highly inaccurate, they always found out that arrived at some random spot within the sphere, and they could not control where they arrives. Since most of the volume in the sphere was empty space, they figured their chances of jumping into an object like a planet, the Sun or some other object was minimal, so they just accepted that risk, as they were pirates after all, and risk was part of their profession.

The planets and sun are known as follows:

Helios is the innermost object, it is a Sunlike star identical to the sun in most respects, the pirates noted the lack of a Solar wind coming from it, Al's the crystal sphere blocked all cosmic rays from getting inside. All objects of ssignificant had their own planar gravity of 1g and also holding onto atmospheric envelopes. The pirates turned off their own artificial gravity and discovered their ship had planar gravity too, and grabbed at atmospheric envelope when it took off from Gaia, the pirates tested this out when they walked on the surface of their corsair without space suits.

The innermost planet is Hermes, it has the same mass and orbital properties as Mercury, except for is habitable atmosphere, the presence of water on its surface and its inhabitants. Inside its atmosphere, the gravity is 1g, outside it, the gravity detected is the same as Mercury.

Aphrodite has the same mass and orbital characteristics as Venus, the same gravity characteristics as Mercury, except that the difference between it's out of atmosphere gravity and within atmosphere gravity is less, all the planets share this characteristic so I'll mention this no more. Aphrodite is a planet inhabited by dinosaurs and women warriors that worship a goddess of the same name as their planet.

The pirates explored Gaia, and what they found will be covered in a future post.

The Pirates visited Ares, its inhabitants were orcs and some warlike humans.

Zeus's had a breathable atmosphere and lots of flying creatures and floating islands of rock supported my means they could not determine, Kronos was much the same, dimmer but warmer and sported a set of rings made of ice and it's own atmosphere and gravity as well. Uranus and Neptune were ocean planets with light sources under the clouds, the pirates flew through them, so they were not solid, surprisingly, these two planets Uranos, and Poseidon were warmer than expected and had islands on their mostly ocean surfaces.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Officially, I am putting the Helios System in Hex 0409 in the Regina subsector of the Spinward Marches this is 1 parsecs away from the Regina system, the crystal sphere hides the presence of the planets and star within the system. Most people think it is just an empty hex, the pirates jumped there accidentally and have kept the information to themselves, they have the location on their Ship's computer so they can jump to it. All the Ship's systems work within the crystal sphere except the Jump drive, hence is location as a secret pirates base, the locals won't tell of course as they can't get outside the sphere, they would die if they attempted to do so with a spelljamming ship. The pirates know about magic and so they try to avoid confrontations with spellcasters if the can. They can refuel their ships with water, and they keep any hostages on the planet Gaia, that they managed to kidnap and hold for ransom, this strategy has thus far proved successful, some hostages have managed to escape their base camp but they lack the means to get off the planet.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

The preceding map is just a preliminary map showing coastlines with 150 mile hexes. The lines of latitude and longitude are also shown in increments of 10 degrees. I plan to add more detail, mountains and other terrain types besides water and land in my next interaction. The first just shows you coastlines. The setting date is 1775, the technology and political situations is comparable to this date in history.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

An important event in the recent past is the Elf and Orcish War 1754 to 1763, in which the elves of Alfheim (France) fought a war with the British over the Ohio territory. The elves had a colony in Canada which traded with the Orcs for furs which were sent back to Europe. Many Orc tribes allied themselves with the elves to claim the Ohio territory for their own, this was part of the Seven Years War which was fought between Alfheim and the British Empire. The British defeated the elves and took Canada for itself while allowing the elves that lived there to remain on the condition that they swore their loyalty to King George.

Just a note: I'm not following the alignment tendencies stated in the Monster Manual entries of the various races discussed here. Elves have neutral alignment tendencies as do humans and orcs. meaning that any one of them can have any alignment at all. The Orcs are native to North America, some are peaceful, others are not, their motivations are the same as the native Americans of our timeline, I am also dropping the intelligence penalty for orc characters and they are presented as a player character race, their favored character class is Barbarian.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

This being a low level campaign, the advancement tables are as follows:

Character
Level xp
1 - 0
2 - 1,000
3 - 2,000
4 - 4,000
5 - 8,000
6 - 16,000
7 - 32,000
8 - 64,000
9 - 125,000
10 - 250,000
11 - 500,000
12 - 1,000,000
And so on

To counteract this somewhat, I award xp for gold pieces collected on a 1 for 1 basis, just as it was in 2nd edition, this provides for rapid advances initially but slows it down later on. To be clear, the xp is earned both for gold piece value of treasure collected and the usual xp awards as described in the 3.5 Dungeon Masters Guide, and gold pieces aren't spent to buy xp, so is earned for gaining treasure not purchased with it. Advancement it limited, and this is a military adventure setting, PC will meet their goals by leading troops into battle as opposed to going through dungeons and killing things.

Tom Kalbfus

Catalyst
Catalyst's picture

This might be a bit off topic, but I've always had some disagreement with the way D&D handles firearms doing more damage than other weapons. Does a bullet really do 2d12 compared with a greatsword's 2d6? To put it another way, does getting shot really do more damage to you than being hit by a sword? The major advantage of early firearms was their ability to penetrate armor, something which is not captured in D&D's rules at all. I'm curious how your system handles this?

Tom Kalbfus

Traveller T20 has two kinds of Armor, archaic armor with only half its protection against modern weapons, and modern armor, which gives full protection against both modern and archaic weapons (read bows and arrows, and swords etc) also in T20 armor has an additional effect, for ever point value of protection it removes one Dice value of damage received by the attack except for the last one. T20 has two kinds of hit points, stamina and lifeblood. Stamina is just like D&D hit points, it increases with level, and Lifeblood is equal to a character's constitution score. When an attacker hits normally, the damage is taken from stamina, but when he achieves a critical hit, the damage is taken from lifeblood.

When a character loses all his stamina points he loses consciousness, but when he loses all his Lifeblood down to -10 he is dead. One can lose Lifeblood without losing Stamina and one can lose stamina without losing Lifeblood, but when a character takes more normal damage than he has stamina points, the leftover damage is deducted from Lifeblood. This system substitutes and is used instead of the Fortitude check used to determine survival when a character takes massive damage. Yeah I know it sounds complicated but it is what Traveller uses.

This setting is a setting within a setting it is a semi historical fantasy setting inside a chrystal sphere that is floating in space in the Traveller T20 setting. In the fantasy setting a version of the American War of Independence is about to take place with magic, fantasy races, and monsters substituting for some of the combatants, outside the sphere it's the Traveller T20 setting set in the classical era 1100 Imperial. Only a groups of space pirates is aware of this crystal sphere and they use it as a hideout keeping a low profile, some of the spellcasters can be a threat to them if they found out, and they are also wanted criminals by the Imperium outside as well, so they don't want to be captured by them as well.

The pirates aren't that familiar with the American War of Independence, as it was such a long time ago, but they are intrigued that an imperfect duplicate of the Solar System exists in this crystal sphere which is 62 astronomical units in radius, they don't know what material the crystal sphere is made of, and it has proven to be indestructible to Lasers and all weapons they can think of, they are not scientists anyway, but criminals and they don't care about it except that this is a good place to hide their loot and keep hostages, one of their hostages has escaped however, she is a Noble named Cybelle Gardner, the pirates have hijacked her Yacht and killed her entire crew except her because she is a valuable hostage, but she also has psionic powers that the pirates didn't know about and she teleported away from their clutches and she found herself in this worlds Boston, Massachusetts seemingly in the year 1775, she knows a bit about ancient Terran history and is doing her best to blend in so the pirates don't recapture her, she met a few orcs, and witnessed some magic spells being used, so she realizes that it is not a perfect replay of history. Just a bunch of plot hooks for player characters.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

A bullet concentrates the same damage over a smaller area, bullets travel much faster than a swung sword. The sword blade has more mass than a bullet fired from a gun. The energy of a sword or a bullet is proportional to mass and to the square of its velocity. A sword has much less velocity than a bullet fired from a gun. The distribution of impact energy onto Armor is over a wider area than a bullet, and the armor is better equipped to stopping that sword Blade than stopping that bullet, so that armor has less protection against high velocity bullets, than slower swung swords.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

A bullet concentrates the same damage over a smaller area, bullets travel much faster than a swung sword. The sword blade has more mass than a bullet fired from a gun. The energy of a sword or a bullet is proportional to mass and to the square of its velocity. A sword has much less velocity than a bullet fired from a gun. The distribution of impact energy onto Armor is over a wider area than a bullet, and the armor is better equipped to stopping that sword Blade than stopping that bullet, so that armor has less protection against high velocity bullets, than slower swung swords.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I think I will simplify it over what T20 does, I'll just use two kinds or Armor class, one is regular armor class (AC) used for the weapons found in the Player's Handbook, and I'll use a second Armor class, I'll label High Impact Armor Class (HIAC), HIAC uses only half the Armor protection listed by each Armor type, this is when getting shot by a musket or rifle. Otherwise I'll just use hit points, I don't need Lifeblood, lifeblood exists to make combat more lethal in Traveller, so people duck and cover instead of just wading into a hail of bullets walking up to an enemy and swinging his sword, not exactly a concern for 18th century weapons I think.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is a list of weapons available in this campaign, pistols, muskets, and rifles count as simple weapons by the way, as they require very little training to use compared to a sword for instance.
Weapons
Cost Simple Weapons
Unarmed Attacks
2 gp Gauntlet damage 1d3, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning,
0 gp Unarmed strike damage 1d3, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning,
Light Melee Weapons
2 gp Dagger damage 1d4, Critical 19-20/ ×2, Type Piercing or slashing, range incr. 10 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
2 gp Dagger, punching damage 1d4, Critical ×3, Type Piercing,
5 gp Gauntlet, spiked damage 1d4, Critical ×2, Type Piercing,
5 gp Mace, light damage 1d6, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning,
6 gp Sickle damage 1d6, Critical ×2, Type Slashing,
One-Handed Melee Weapons
0 gp Club damage 1d6, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning, range incr. 10 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
12 gp Mace, heavy damage 1d8, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning,
8 gp Morningstar damage 1d8, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning and piercing,
1 gp Shortspear damage 1d6, Critical ×2, Type Piercing, range incr. 20 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
Two-Handed Melee Weapons
5 gp Longspear damage 1d8, Critical ×3, Type Piercing,
0 gp Quarterstaff damage 1d6/1d6, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning,
2 gp Spear damage 1d8, Critical ×3, Type Piercing, range incr. 20 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
Ranged Weapons
50 gp Crossbow, heavy damage 1d10, Critical 19-20/×2, Type Piercing, range incr. 120 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
1 gp Bolts, crossbow (10)
35 gp Crossbow, light damage 1d8, Critical 19-20/×2, Type Piercing, range incr. 80 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
1 gp Bolts, crossbow (10)
5 sp Dart damage 1d4, Critical ×2, Type Piercing, range incr. 20 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
1 gp Javelin damage 1d6, Critical ×2, Type Piercing, range incr. 30 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
0 gp Sling damage 1d4, Critical ×2, Type Bludgeoning, range incr. 50 ft., rate of fire 1 magazine 1 int.
1 sp Bullets, sling (10)
Gunpowder Weapons
Flintlock Handguns
90 gp Snaplock pistol damage 2d4, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 10 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Med, weight 3 lb.
3 gp Pistol shot and powder (12)
68 gp Blunderbuss pistol damage 2d8, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 5 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Med, weight 6 lb.
3 gp Pistol shot and powder (12)
68 gp Dueling pistol damage 2d6, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 20 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Med, weight 3 lb.
3 gp Pistol shot and powder (12)
Flintlock Longarms
125 gp Snaplock musket damage 2d8, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 30 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Large, weight 14 lb.
3 gp Musket shot and powder (10)
68 gp Blunderbuss musket damage 2d10, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 5 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Large, weight 14 lb.
3 gp Musket shot and powder (10)
13 gp Brown Bess (.75 musket) damage 2d10, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 20 ft., rate of fire 1/4 magazine 1 int. size Large, weight 10 lb.
3 gp Musket shot and powder (10)
55 gp Ferguson rifle damage 2d10, Critical ×2, type Ballistic, range incr. 40 ft., rate of fire 1/3 magazine 1 int. size Large, weight 8 lb.
3 gp Rifle shot and powder (10)

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

The other items on the PHb are available as well, armorers and sword smiths are a bit rare in the American colonies, most farmers don't have a use for swords, but most have muskets for both hunting and defending their homes from marauding orcs and barbarians. Officers often carry swords, and people often want to shoot the guy holding a sword in the opposing enemy formation. Armorers are even harder to find than sword Smith's, it is much. easier to train a person to use a musket than to use plate mail, full plate and other types of heavy Armor, also they are only half as effective against muskets and rifles but are still expensive to produce and repair. Individuals can still get the skill Craft(Armor) but they will need to make it themselves, very few suits of plate Armor exist in second hand shops.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is the expanded list of Transports, the new ones come from d20 Past, but I translated their purchase DCs into gold piece prices.
Transport
Item Cost Weight
Carriage 100 gp 600 lb. Source PHb
Cart 15 gp 200 lb. Source PHb
Galley 30,000 gp lb. Source PHb
Keelboat 3,000 gp Source PHb
Longship 10,000 gp Source PHb
Rowboat 50 gp Source PHb
Oar 2 gp Source PHb
Sailing ship 10,000 gp Source PHb
Great galley 12,000 gp Source d20 Past
Cog 9,000 gp Source d20 Past
Chinese junk 6,500 gp Source d20 Past
Carrack 20,000 gp Source d20 Past
Caravel 15,000 gp Source d20 Past
Galleon 65,000 gp Source d20 Past
Pinnace 9,000 gp Source d20 Past
East Indianman 120,000 gp Source d20 Past
Frigate 35,000 gp Source d20 Past
Schooner 12,000 gp Source d20 Past
Sled 20 gp Source PHb
Wagon 35 gp Source PHb
Warship 25,000 gp Source PHb

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here's the revised Orc Monster Manual Entry, they are a little different for this setting.
Orc
Orc, 1st-Level Barbarian
Medium Humanoid (Orc)
Hit Dice: 1d12+1 (7 hp)
Initiative: +0
Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares)
Armor Class: 13 (+3 studded leather armor), touch 10, flat-footed 13
Ballistic Armor Class: 11 (+1 studded leather armor), flat-footed 11 (vs. guns)
Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+4
Attack: Greataxe +4 melee (1d12+4/×3) or composite longbow (Str +3) +1 ranged (1d8+3/×3), or Ferguson rifle +1 ranged (2d20/×2)
Full Attack: Greataxe +4 melee (1d12+4/×3) or composite longbow (Str +3) +1 ranged (1d8+3/×3), or Ferguson rifle +1 ranged (2d20/×2)
Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft.
Special Attacks rage 1/day
Special Qualities: Low-light vision Orc traits.
Saves: Fort +3, Ref +0, Will -2
Abilities: Str 17, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 7, Cha 6
Skills: Listen +1, Spot +1
Feats: Alertness
Environment: Temperate hills, plains, and forest
Organization: Gang (2-4), squad (11-20 plus 2 3rd level subchiefs and 1 war chief 3rd-6th level), or village (30-100 plus 150% noncombatants plus 1 3rd-level subchief per 10 adults, 5 5th-level warchiefs, and 3 7th-level tribal elders.
Challenge Rating: 1
Treasure: Standard
Alignment: Any
Advancement: By character class
Level Adjustment: 0
This creature looks like a primitive human with brown skin, and dark coarse hair, standing on average from 6 to 8 feet tall. Orcs have prominent lower canines extending from their massive jaws that resemble a boar's tusks.
Orcs as Characters
Orc leaders tend to be barbarians. Orc druids worship Gaia
Orc Traits: Orcs possess the following racial traits,
+4 Strength, -2 Wisdom, -2 Charisma
An orc's base land speed is 30 feet
Low-light vision: An orc can see twice as far as a human in starlight, torchlight, and similar conditions of poor illimination. He retains the ability to distinguish color and detail under these conditions. Orc traits.
Weapon Familiarity: Orcs may treat orc double axes as martial weapons, rather than exotic weapons.
Automatic Languages: English, Orc. Bonus Languages: French, Spanish
Favored Class: Barbarian

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here are a few transport items relevant to this campaign.
Transport
Carriage: This four-wheeled vehicle can transport as many as
four people within an enclosed cab, plus two drivers. In general,
two horses (or other beasts of burden) draw it. A carriage comes
with the harness needed to pull it. 100 gp
Cart: This two-wheeled vehicle can be drawn by a single horse
(or other beast of burden). It comes with a harness. 15 gp
Galley: This three-masted ship has seventy oars on either side
and requires a total crew of 200. A galley is 26 squares long and 4 squares
wide, and it can carry 150 tons of cargo or 250 soldiers. For 8,000 gp
more, it can be fitted with a ram and castles with firing platforms
fore, aft, and amidships. This ship cannot make sea voyages and
sticks to the coast. It moves about 4 miles per hour when being
rowed or under sail. 30,000 gp
Keelboat: This 10- to 15-square-long ship is 3 to 4 squares wide and
has a few oars to supplement its single mast with a square sail. It
has a crew of eight to fifteen and can carry 40 to 50 tons of cargo or
100 soldiers. It can make sea voyages, as well as sail down rivers
(thanks to its flat bottom). It moves about 1 mile per hour. 3,000 gp
Longship: This 15-square-long ship with forty oars requires a total
crew of 50. It has a single mast and a square sail, and it can carry 50
tons of cargo or about 120 soldiers. A longship can make sea voyages. It
moves about 3 miles per hour when being towed or under sail. 10,000 gp
Rowboat This 2-square-long boat holds two or three
Medium passengers. It moves about 1-1/2 miles per hour. 50 gp
Sailing ship: This larger, seaworthy ship is 15 to 18 squares long
and 4 squares wide and has a crew of 20. It can carry 150 tons of
cargo. It has square sails on it's two masts and can make sea voy-
ages. It moves about 2 miles per hour. 10,000 gp
Great galley: Used since the time of the ancient Greeks, gal-
leys remain in use until the beginning of the nineteenth century,
particularly in the Mediterranean. Algerians pirates favor them
in the seventeenth century, and France copies some of their
designs. The Venetians are credited with the invention of the
Galley gross. Or "great galley," in the thirteenth century.
The advantages of a Galley are its maneuverability (com-
pared to a sailing ship), its speed over short distances, and the
fact that it is often equipped with a ram. A halley's crew qual-
ity leaves something to be desired, however-its rowers are
typically criminals or exiles sent to the galleys as punishment
for their crimes. A Galley crew rarely rises above untrained
quality, though the crew of an Algerian pirate Galley might be
more skilled.
A great galley is 35 squares long and 7 squares wide in
character scale. It includes two or three lateen-rigged sails,
and is sometimes armed with up to fourteen 9-pound cannon
on swivel mounts. By the sixteenth century, Venetian galleys
carry a battery of six forward-facing 18-pound cannon. 12,000 gp
Cog: While the Mediterranean world uses galleys, the mer-
chant ship of the early North Atlantic is the cog, a tall and round
ship with square sails. By the end of the fifteenth century, cogs
include a second square sailed in the fore and a modified lateen
sail in the aft.
A cog is 19 squares long and 5 squares wide in character
scale. Two 9-pound cannon are set on swivel mounts on the
forecastle and two more in the rear, and later models include
five 18-pound cannon on each side, firing from a gun deck below
the main deck. 9,000 gp
Chinese junk: "Junk" is a very general term for ships of
Chinese or Japanese origin. A typical oceangoing junk of the
nineteenth century is 18 squares long and 5 squares wide. Its
armament consists of six heavy match lock muskets on swivel
mounts on the main deck. 6,500 gp
Carrack: The carrack of 1470 is dominated by a huge square
mainsail, with a square sail fore and a lateen sail aft. Symbols
of political power, barracks serve both as merchant ships and
warships. A typical carrack is 21 squares long and 6 squares
wide. It might include as many as twenty 9-pound cannon on
swivel mounts fore and aft. 20,000 gp
Caravel: Combining the lateen sails of later Mediterranean
galleys with the building techniques of northern dogs, caravels
originated in Portugal in the fifteenth century and are sometimes
said to have launched the Age of Exploration. A typical caravel
includes three lateen sails, though later (and larger) versions
built for war toward the end of the sixteenth century include a
square sail in the fore. A typical caravel is 14 squares long and
5 squares wide. 15,000 gp
Galleon: The ultimate development of the carrack expressly
designed for war, the galleon is the largest ship of the sixteenth
century. It has four masts-two aft bearing lateen sails, and one
fore and the mainmast carry square sails with topgallant sails.
A typical galleon of the later sixteenth century is 30 squares
long and 6 squares wide. It has thirty-two 18-pound cannon on
a gun deck below the main deck, and two 9-pounders on swivel
mounts on its quarterdeck. 65,000 gp
Pinnace: A pinnacle is a small, light ship designed for scout-
ing. Similar to some caravels, a pinnacle has a lateen sail aft and
square sails with top sails in the fore and main mast. A pinnace
is 18 squares long and 5 squares wide. It carries five 9-pound
cannon on swivel mounts on its deck. 9,000 gp
East Indianman: These enormous ships make up the bulk
of the fleet of the Dutch East India Company, hence their
name. The company sponsored some eight thousand voyages
between Holland and the East Indies during the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries. These vessels are similar to galle-
one and the other warships of the same period, and are fully
capable of self-defense. They have three masts, which are
mostly square-rigged.
An East Indiaman is typically crammed with sailors and
soldiers-a typical complement is about 70 sailors and 130
soldiers, working in three shifts. The ship is 30 squares long
and 7 squares wide in character scale. It has forty-two 18-pound
cannon on gun decks-sixteen each on the port and starboard
side, and ten more on the aft face of the vessel. 120,000 gp
Frigate: The defining characteristic of a frigate is its speed,
attained by putting all the guns on a single deck close to the
water line, with the lower deck at or below the waterline. It has
unusually spacious quarters for the crew. A typical frigate is 25
squares long and 7 squares wide in character scale. It carries
some twenty-eight to thirty-six 18-pound cannon on its single
gun deck. 35,000 gp
Schooner: Designed as a small naval cruiser but also used
for Mercantile purposes (including British tax collectors in the
American colonies), schooners typically have two masts of
roughly equal height, topsail, and headsails. A typical schooner
is 16 squares long and 5 squares wide. 12,000 gp
Sled: This is a wagon on runners for moving through snow and
over ice. In general, two horses (or other beasts of burden) draw it.
A sled comes with harness needed to pull it. 20 gp
Wagon: This is a four-wheeled, open vehicle for transporting
heavy loads. In general, two horses (or other beasts of burden)
draw it. A wagon comes with the harness needed to pull it. 35 gp
Warship: This 20-square-long ship has a single mast, although
oars can also propel it. It has a crew of 60 to 80 towers. This ship can
carry 160 soldiers, but not for long distances, since there isn't room
for supplies to support that many people. The warship cannot
make sea voyages and sticks to the coast. It is not used for cargo. It
moves about 2-1/2 miles per hour when rowed or under sail.
Ammunition
Cannon
Round shot and powder (Chain shot or Grapeshot)
1-pound (10) 2 gp (3 gp)
6-pound (10) 3 gp (4 gp)
9-pound (10) 4 gp (5 gp)
12-pound (10) 5 gp (7 gp)
18-pound (10) 7 gp (9 gp)
32-pound (10) 9 gp (12 gp)
60-pound (10) 12 gp (15 gp)

Tom Kalbfus

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Having ships in your game is worthwhile. There's a problem when a ship can be traded in for a +3 weapon. A lot of ink has been spilled on the problems with wealth by level and 'fun things' like ships.

Information about the size and cost of a ship is helpful, but which is actually better, a Frigate or a Galleon? What makes it so? Can I hope to defeat a Galleon in a sea battle? How important are things like wind direction and maneuverability? Are you using arcs of fire?

Most players aren't going to be masters of 18th/19th century naval combat, but they're going to want to know what a ship can do.

Tom Kalbfus

The ships come from d20 Past, which is a supplement of d20 Modern, the age of sail is inbetween they late D&D era and the modern period, mostly the main difference is this era has better, faster and more seaworthy ships, my setting occurs in the late 18th century on a sort of parallel Earth, the British Empire exists, the American colonies exist, France is an elven nation called Alfheim but very much similar to France in many respects. Alfheim is less patriarchal than France was at the time, its equally likely to have a ruling queen as a king, and about one third of the members in its Navy, army, or marine forces are women. The American Revolution is about to start, and at some point Alfheim will align itself with the American colonists against the British Empire.

The Native Americans in this setting are referred to as barbarians, about 40% of them are orcs, the other 40% are humans, the orcs by the way do not default as an evil alignment, though there is still likely to be conflicts between them and the colonists, these orcs do not have a -2 adjustment on their intelligence scores, and their skin is a brown color rather than gray or green, they worship Gaia instead of Gruumish, and they are nocturnal but above ground creatures, in other words they have low-light vision instead of dark vision. There are also some wild elves native to North America which make up the remaining 20% of the native population.

The ships in d20 Past have stats, hull points and so forth, what I have supplied are their prices in gold pieces for ease of reference. There is a table in the d20 Modern core rulebook which translates purchase DCs into dollar amounts, and I have assumed for this purpose that a gold piece is worth ten dollars, and this produces prices that are similar to the ship listings in the Player's Handbook. Magic items are rare, and some of them are easily worth more than a ship.

Characters have two armor classes, one is called Armor Class, and that is the same as used in the player's handbook, the other is Ballistic Armor Class or BAC for short. BAC is inferior to AC when Armor is worn. BAC includes only half the non-magical armor adjustment rounded down, magical armor bonuses to the Armor and defensive magical items still get their full bonuses. A bracier of defense or a ring of protection is just as effective against ballistic weapons as they are against any other weapon type. George Washington wears a ring of protection and carries magic sword as an officer in the Continental Army, he is of the fighter class by the way. I suppose there are a few magic rifles and magic bullets as well. Magic bullets are one use only, typically they are made of silver, though the silver can be recycled if the bullets are recovered, this also makes them effective against werewolves should any be encountered. There are lots of wolves in the wilderness, and some of them are werewolves, some are were bears. Some orcs are druids and they can change into animal form if they are high enough level. Not to mention there are non-evil worgs in the wilderness as well, they are intelligent and trainable, which is why orcs like to use them.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I'll take a moment to show the settings larger Universe.
Here is the Planet Gaia as seen from inside the crystal Sphere:
https://ibb.co/k8y0hst
Pulling further away this is Gaia and its moon Selene, it looks remarkably like Earth's Moon.
https://ibb.co/FDQ7LkS
This is the inner system with the names of the inner planets:
https://ibb.co/7WQbqdh
And these are the outer planets out to the crystal Sphere itself:
https://ibb.co/gWf6fpS
This is my first time posting images directly so I hope they come out alright.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

The positions of the planets are those on January 1, 1775 which is the date of the start of the campaign. I've obtained these images by running Universe Sandbox backwards in reverse time until the date January 1, 1775 was achieved, and then I relabeled the planets with Greek names to the corresponding Roman gods that our planets are named after. This is a different world to our own, but the history does sort of run parallel to it, but not too much so. After January 1, 1775 anything can happen. There is some Spelljamming going on in this sphere and the other planets are inhabited.

This Crystal Sphere is located in the Regina Subsector of the Spinward Marches in the apparently empty hex 2009 according to this map located here:
https://wiki.travellerrpg.com/Regina_Subsector
This is sometime after 1100 imperial, I haven't decided when just yet. There is a whole Traveller setting outside the Crystal Sphere floating in the vacuum of space. This crystal Sphere is hard to detect from outside, it blocks both gravity and electromagnetic emissions. Most of the denizens of this setting are unaware this place even exists except for a noble named Cybelle who is stranded there and the pirates who have captured her. She is a 6th level Noble in the T20 game, a possible patron encounter for the PCs in some future adventure. I am still working on her stats, she is keeping a low profile and is without most of her equipment at the moment in Boston of the World Gaia, she hopes to recover her ship with some help, and get off this planet.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here are some sample 1st level characters I randomly rolled up using the 4d6-pick the best 3 in order method:
1st level male human sorcerer Str 11, Dex 11, Con 11, Int 12, Wis 12, Cha 14, Com 11.
1st level female human sorceress Str 12, Dex 14, Con 10, Int 11, Wis 11, Cha 17, Com 11.
1st level male dwarf barbarian Str 11, Dex 7, Con 18, Int 14, Wis 13, Cha 8, Com 10.
1st level female dwarf barbarian Str 15, Dex 9, Con 15, Int 12, Wis 9, Cha 10, Com 17.
1st level male elf rogue Str 13, Dex 18, Con 13, Int 8, Wis 11, Cha 12, Com 14.
1st level female elf cleric Str 9, Dex 10, Con 13, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 10, Com 18.
1st level male gnome wizard Str 13, Dex 7, Con 12, Int 15, Wis 12, Cha 13, Com 13.
1st level female gnome sorceress Str 8, Dex 13, Con 15, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 15, Com 18.
1st level male half-elf fighter Str 14, Dex 8, Con 13, Int 6, Wis 9, Cha 14, Com 12.
1st level female half-elf barbarian Str 9, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 10, Cha 11, Com 17.
1st level male half-orc barbarian Str 12, Dex 12, Con 13, Int 16, Wis 9, Cha 10, Com 7.
1st level female half-orc barbarian Str 13, Dex 11, Con 15, Int 15, Wis 12, Cha 8, Com 13.
1st level male halfling rogue Str 11, Dex 13, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 12, Cha 10, Com 11.
1st level female halfling wizard Str 12, Dex 11, Con 11, Int 14, Wis 9, Cha 11, Com 14.
1st level male orc fighter Str 16, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 10, Wis 3, Cha 8, Com 6.
1st level female orc cleric Str 11, Dex 10, Con 8, Int 14, Wis 15, Cha 9, Com 8.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Just an explanation of how I plan to use Comeliness in my campaign. Comeliness is an ability score indicating a character's physical beauty or good looks, social interaction skills are modified either by Charisma or Comeliness, whichever score is higher, the thing about comeliness is that it is purely physical, not a measure of one's force of personality, it does not help a sorceress to be beautiful for example, spells are determined only by her charisma score. Here is a list of skills which use charisma but for which a higher comeliness modifier could be substituted for:

Bluff
Diplomacy
Disguise
Gather Information
Perform

People can be suckers for a pretty face, so it is easier for such a person to bluff, that is lie. It doesn't hurt a diplomat to be good looking, this gives an advantage to negotiations. A good looking person would be better as disguises, so long as it's not an ugly looking disguise, such as that of a disfigured beggar for instance. People are more willing to talk to and divulge information to a good looking person. And it helps ones performance when the audience want to look at you because you are so attractive. That is my rationale.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is a few more randomly rolled characters:
1st level male human bard Str 10, Dex 17, Con 6, Int 9, Wis 12, Cha 12, Com 16.
1st level female human barbarian Str 9, Dex 15, Con 17, Int 14, Wis 11, Cha 15, Com 14.
1st level male dwarf barbarian Str 10, Dex 12, Con 16, Int 15, Wis 9, Cha 6, Com 8.
1st level female dwarf druid Str 11, Dex 7, Con 10, Int 13, Wis 13, Cha 11, Com 15.
1st level male elf wizard Str 9, Dex 12, Con 6, Int 12, Wis 9, Cha 7, Com 9.
1st level female elf bard Str 7, Dex 15, Con 6, Int 9, Wis 9, Cha 12, Com 21.
1st level male gnome ranger Str 10, Dex 17, Con 13, Int 15, Wis 7, Cha 13, Com 13.
1st level female gnome barbarian Str 11, Dex 13, Con 15,Int 14, Wis 12 Cha 12, Com 16.
1st level male half-elf barbarian Str 12, Dex 13, Con 14, Int 11, Wis 15, Cha 9, Com 15.
1st level female half-elf fighter Str
16, Dex 14, Con 13, Int 14, Wis 13, Cha 14, Com 14.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Now for some randomly rolled Traveller T20 characters.
1st level male human merchant Str 13, Dex 10, Con 11, Int 16, Edu 13, Wis 15, Cha 15, Com 13, Soc 12.
1st level male human professional Str 14, Dex 10, Con 11, Int 11, Edu 16, Wis 9, Cha 10, Com 9, Soc 13.
1st level male human professional Str 12, Dex 7, Con 9, Int 13, Edu 17, Wis 7, Cha 10, Com 10, Soc 12.
1st level female human rogue Str 13, Dex 14, Con 11, Int 14, Edu 8, Wis 13, Cha 10, Com 10, Soc 15.
1st level male human rogue Str 14, Dex 15, Con 9, Int 10, Edu 10, Wis 12, Cha 7, Com 9, Soc 15.
1st level female human marine Str 11, Dex 15, Con 16, Int 11, Edu 12, Wis 14, Cha 12, Com 16, Soc 5.
1st level male human rogue Str 14, Dex 15, Con 9, Int 10, Edu 10, Wis 12, Cha 7, Soc 15.
1st level female human rogue Str 13, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 12, Edu 10, Wis 10, Cha 11, Com 16, Soc 12.
1st level female human professional Str 6, Int 11, Con 7, Int 12, Edu 13, Wis 9, Cha 13, Com 15, Soc 10.
1st level female human rogue Str 12, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 12, Edu 10, Wis 15, Cha 12, Com 10, Soc 11.
1st level male human merchant Str 9, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 11, Edu 15, Wis 15, Cha 12, Com 12, Soc 11.
1st level female human mercenary Str 16, Dex 12, Con 13, Int 11, Edu 10, Wis 14, Cha 13, Com 18, Soc 7.
1st level male human professional Str 12, Dex 12, Con 14, Int 10, Edu 14, Wis 11, Cha 9, Com 8, Soc 13.
1st level female human noble Str 13, Dex 14, Con 14, Int 14, Edu 15, Wis 11, Cha 17, Com 11, Soc 16.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I have in mind having some Traveller PC characters start in this D&D setting, the party will also include some D&D characters to round out the party's magical abilities. The Traveller PCs have been kidnapped by space pirates and they managed to escape, they are without most of their equipment, so they have to learn to fight with a sword, bow, or musket, one of the campaign goals is recovering their Starship and getting off the planet, in the meantime they will gain some experience.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

These are just human D&D characters.
1st level male human sorcerer Str 12, Dex 9, Con 10, Int 10, Int 10, Wis 10, Cha 12, Com 14.
1st level female human rogue Str 11, Dex 15, Con 13, Int 13, Wis 8, Cha 16, Com 15.
1st level male human cleric Str 10, Dex 17, Con 11, Int 10, Wis 16, Cha 15, Com 15.
1st level female human rogue Str 11, Dex 15, Con 11, Int 10, Wis 12, Cha 13, Com 17.
1st level male human sorcerer Str 14, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 10, Cha 14, Com 12.
1st level female human sorceress Str 8, Dex 14, Con 8, Int 9, Wis 11, Cha 15, Com 17.
1st level male human rogue Str 10, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 12, Wis 11, Cha 11, Com 9.
1st level female human rogue Str 12, Dex 15, Con 9, Int 9, Wis 9, Cha 13, Com 14.
1st level male human barbarian Str 10, Dex 13, Con 14, Int 8, Wis 9, Cha 12, Com 13.
1st level female human rogue Str 5, Dex 14, Con 12, Int 13. Wis 6, Cha 11, Com 10.
1st level male human wizard Str 14, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 16, Wis 15, Cha 11, Com 13.
1st level female human fighter Str 15, Dex 14, Con 10, Int 12, Wis 9, Cha 8, Com 10.
1st level male human rogue Str 12, Dex 15, Con 13, Int 10, Wis 13, Cha 14, Com 11.
1st level male human sorcerer Str 13, Dex 12, Con 9, Int 12, Wis 8, Cha 15, Com 12.
1st level male human cleric Str 13, Dex 11, Con 6, Int 9, Wis 14, Cha 11, Com 14.
1st level female human cleric Str 8. Dex 10, Con 6, Int 9, Wis 16, Cha 13, Com 12.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I'm a little short on fighters, if we are going to do the revolutionary war, we need human fighters, well here they are.
1st level male human fighter Str 13, Dex 8, Con 11, Int 14, Wis 12, Cha 13, Com 8.
1st level female human fighter Str 12, Dex 8, Con 11, Int 12, Wis 16, Cha 15, Com 9.
1st level female human fighter Str 9, Dex 10, Con 11, Int 13, Wis 16, Cha 11, Com 19.
1st level male human fighter Str 11, Dex 13, Con 12, Int 7, Wis 13, Cha 9, Com 15.
1st level female human fighter Str 9, Dex 12, Con 15, Int 13, Wis 10, Cha 17, Com 16.
1st level female human fighter Str 11, Dex 15, Con 9, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 15, Com 11.
1st level male human fighter Str 11, Dex 7, Con 14, Int 10, Wis 11, Cha 9, Com 9.
1st level female human fighter Str 10, Dex 10, Con 12, Int 11, Wis 12, Cha 13, Com 12.
1st level male human fighter Str 11, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 12, Wis 7, Cha 10, Com 9.
1st level female human fighter Str 11, Dex 10, Con 15, Int 12, Wis 14, Cha 10, Com 16.
1st level female human fighter Str 10, Dex 12, Con 15, Int 10, Wis 16, Cha 18, Com 11.
1st level male human fighter Str 12, DeX 13, Con 10, Int 15, Wis 14, Cha 13, Com 14.
1st level male human fighter Str 14, Dex 13, Con 9, Int 12, Wis 10, Cha 16, Com 12.
1st level male human fighter Str 10, Dex 11, Con 13, Int 14, Wis 8, Cha 10, Com 11.
1st level male human fighter Str 10, Dex 12, Con 14, Int 9, Wis 12, Cha 7, Com 14.
1st level male human fighter Str 16, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 15, Cha 11, Com 13.
1st level female human fighter Str 9, Dex 12, Con 14, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 18, Com 16.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Okay, I'm done rolling ability scores and selecting classes and races. I'm putting together an elite squad of 20 characters, selecting from what I produced above. This squad is a detached unit working for the Continental Army under George Washington, it includes some offworlders who have escaped from the pirates who kidnapped them, some of the other characters in the unit helped free them. I believe there should be four or five Traveller characters including Noble PC at the bottom, the Noble is Cybelle, according to the Social Standing table in the T20 core rulebook, her social standing of 16 makes her an Imperial Knight in the milieu of the Third Imperium, she has a Yacht in the possession of the pirates that she wants to seize back, she had the misfortune of hiring the wrong crew, who were actually pirates, they captured her ship and took her hostage, bringing her and it to this world in this Crystal Sphere. She has with her four members of her previous crew that were taken hostage and who escaped or where rescued with her. The pirates took the precaution of separating her and her crew from her ship and their equipment, so they are poorly equipped in modern technological terms, they have agreed to help out the Continental Army in return for them helping to get their ship back.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Armor isn't very fashionable in the late 18th century, so I'm importing a mechanic from d20 Modern, the Defense Adjustment, here it is applied to Armor class (AC) and ballistic Armor class (BAC) with equal measure. Armor is Worn by Spanish and Portugese soldiers, but most other soldiers don't wear armor any more. So here are the tables for defense adjustment per class level.

Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
Barbarian
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Bard
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Cleric
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Druid
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Fighter
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Monk
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Paladin
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Ranger
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Rogue
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Sorcerer
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Wizard
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Adept
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Aristocrat
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Commoner
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Warrior
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Army
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Mercenary
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Merchant
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Noble
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +3
2 nd +4
3 rd +4
4 th +5
5 th +5
6 th +6
7 th +6
8 th +7
9 th +7
10 th +8
11 th +8
12 th +9
13 th +9
14 th +10
15 th +10
16 th +11
17 th +11
18 th +12
19 th +12
20 th +13

Professional
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +0
2 nd +1
3 rd +1
4 th +1
5 th +2
6 th +2
7 th +2
8 th +3
9 th +3
10 th +3
11 th +4
12 th +4
13 th +4
14 th +5
15 th +5
16 th +5
17 th +6
18 th +6
19 th +6
20 th +7

Trav. Rogue
Level Defense bonuses for D&D and Traveller character classes.
1 st +1
2 nd +2
3 rd +2
4 th +3
5 th +3
6 th +3
7 th +4
8 th +4
9 th +5
10 th +5
11 th +5
12 th +6
13 th +6
14 th +7
15 th +7
16 th +7
17 th +8
18 th +8
19 th +9
20 th +9

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here are the finalists, we have a party of 15 characters, the Traveller characters I'll do later. 15 is a fairly large party, but some of the early modules assumed parties as large as this. EXPEDITION TO BARRIER PEAK for example.
1st level Male Human Fighter Str 16, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 15, Cha 11, Com 13.
1st level Female Human Fighter Str 9, Dex 12, Con 14, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 18, Com 16.
1st level Female Human Fighter Str 11, Dex 15, Con 9, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 15, Com 11.
1st level Female Human Fighter Str 9, Dex 12, Con 15, Int 13, Wis 10, Cha 17, Com 16.
1st level Male Human Fighter Str 14, Dex 13, Con 9, Int 12, Wis 10, Cha 16, Com 12.
1st level Male Human Fighter Str 12, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 15, Wis 14, Cha 13, Com 14.
1st level Female Human Fighter Str 10, Dex 12, Con 15, Int 10, Wis 16, Cha 18, Com 11.
1st level Male Human Fighter Str 11, Dex 13, Con 10, Int 12, Wis 7, Cha 10, Com 9.
1st level Male Human Cleric Str 10, Dex 17, Con 11, Int 10, Wis 16, Cha 15, Com 15.
1st level Female Half-elf Fighter Str 16, Dex 14, Con 13, Int 14, Wis 13, Cha 14, Com 14.
1st level Female Elf Bard Str 7, Dex 15, Con 6, Int 9, Wis 9, Cha 12, Com 21.
1st level Female Human Sorceress Str 12, Dex 14, Con 10, Int 11, Wis 11, Cha 17, Com 11.
1st level Male Elf Rogue Str 13, Dex 18, Con 14, Int 8, Wis 11, Cha 12, Com 14.
1st level Female Elf Cleric Str 9, Dex 10, Con 13, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 10, Com 18.
1st level Female Dwarf Druid Str 11, Dex 7, Con 10, Int 13, Wis 13, Cha 11, Com 15.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

I just have to include this list of melee weapons to equip my Early Modern character, this is in addition to and overlaps those found in the Players Handbook. Because of the slow rate of fire gunpowder weapons have, it is the usual practised to keep these weapons loaded and ready to fire on the first round, and with the Ferguson Rifle, the next two rounds involve packing in the gunpowder charge, ramming it down with the ram rod, inserting the musket ball, and on the third round raising it up to aim and fire, so there is two rounds between the last shot fired and the next shot to engage in melee combat with they enemy, and typically these weapons are used.
Archaic Weapons
Brandistock dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical ×2 Piercing Large 5 lb. Cost 10 gp
Cutlass, machete, scimitar dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical 18-20 Slashing Small 2 lb. Cost 20 gp
Greatsword dmg vs Small 1d10 vs Medium 2d6 Critical 19-20 Slashing Large 8 lb. Cost 50 gp
Halberd dmg vs Small 1d8 vs Medium 1d10 Critical ×3 Piercing or slashing Large 12 lb. Cost 10 gp
Hatchet, hand axe, tomahawk dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical ×2 Slashing Small 4 lb. Cost 6 gp
Lance dmg vs Small 1d6 vs Medium 1d8 Critical ×2 Piercing Large 10 lb. Cost 10 gp
Longsword dmg vs Small 1d6 vs Medium 1d8 Critical 19-20 Slashing Medium 4 lb. Cost 15 gp
Pike dmg vs Small 1d6 vs Medium 1d8 Critical ×2 Piercing Large 9 lb. Cost 6 gp
Spear dmg vs Small 1d6 vs Medium 1d8 Critical ×2 Piercing Large 6 lb. Cost 2 gp
Rapier, smallsword dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical 18-20 Piercing Medium 2 lb. Cost 20 gp
Saber dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical 18-20 Slashing Medium 3 lb. Cost 20 gp
Pistol-axe dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical ×2 Slashing Medium +1 lb. Cost +6 gp
Pistol-mace dmg vs Small 1d4 vs Medium 1d6 Critical ×2 Bludgeoning Medium +2 lb. Cost +5 gp
Bayonet (fixed) dmg vs Small 1d3/1d4 vs Medium 1d4/1d6 Critical ×2 Piercing/Bludgeoning Large 1 lb. Cost 9 gp

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is a sample character format, I'll add skills and Feats later:
1st level Male Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10+1; hp 13; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 15, BAC 15, touch 15, flat-footed 13; Base Atk +1; Grp +4; Atk +3 ranged (2d6 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3) +4 melee (1d10+3 vs small, 2d6+3 vs med+ /19-20/×2); Full Atk +3 ranged (2d6 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3) +4 melee (1d10+3 vs small, 2d6+3 vs med+ /19-20/×2); AL TN; SV Fort +3, Ref +2, Will +2; Str 16, Dex 14, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 15, Cha 11, Com 13. Possessions: Ferguson rifle, Rifle shot and powder (20 shots), Greatsword, Traveler's outfit, Backpack, Bedroll, Flint and steel, Rations, trail (5 days), Lamp, common, Oil (2-pint flasks), Waterskin, Pouch, belt containing (1 cp, 9 sp, 0 gp, 0 pp), and one bar of Soap (1 lb.).

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is the Armor available for this setting, if character insist on wearing armor. As yo can see, the only available armor which it makes sense to wear is the buff coat, and studded leather armor. Buff coats are of use against melee weapons, and studded armor deflects bullets a little, the other heavier armor imposes higher costs. Where this armor may prove useful is when they are magic Armor. These armor types can be enchanted like any other armor, most people don't bother with Armor as it is too cumbersome for the benefits it imparts, those that wear magic Armor announce to the enemies that they are important targets, because it is assumed that the Armor they are wearing is magical, otherwise why bother!
Gunpowder & Dragons Armor
Light Armor
Buff coat Armor Bonus +1 Ballistic Armor Bonus +0 Maximum Dex Bonus +8 Armor Check Penalty -0 Speed (30 ft.) 30 ft. Weight 5 lb. Cost 5 gp
Studded leather Armor Bonus +3 Ballistic Armor Bonus +1 Maximum Dex Bonus +5 Armor Check Penalty -1 Speed (30 ft.) 30 ft. Weight 20 lb. Cost 25 gp
Medium Armor
Breastplate Armor Bonus +5 Ballistic Armor Bonus +2 Maximum Dex Bonus +3 Armor Check Penalty -4 Speed (30 ft.) 20 ft. Weight 30 lb. Cost 200 gp
Heavy Armor
Three-quarter plate Armor Bonus +7 Ballistic Armor Bonus +3 Maximum Dex Bonus +1 Armor Check Penalty -6 Speed (30 ft.) 20 ft. Weight 45 lb. Cost 1000 gp

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is a complete, ready-to-play character for the Gunpowder & Dragons setting.
1st level Male Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10+1; hp 13; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 15, BAC 15, touch 15, flat-footed 13, flat-footed ballistic 13; Base Atk +1; Grp +4; Atk +3 ranged (2d6 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +4 melee (1d10+3 vs small, 2d6+3 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Greatsword) Full Atk +3 ranged (2d6 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +4 melee (1d10+3 vs small, 2d6+3 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Greatsword) AL TN; SV Fort +3, Ref +2, Will +2; Str 16, Dex 14, Con 12, Int 13, Wis 15, Cha 11, Com 13.
Skills and Feats:
Climb +7, Handle Animal +4, Intimidate +2, Jump +5, Ride +4, Swim +5; Dodge, Power Attack, Cleave.
Possessions:
Ferguson rifle, Rifle shot and powder (20 shots), Greatsword, Traveler's outfit, Backpack, Bedroll, Flint and steel, Rations, trail (5 days), Lamp, common, Oil (2-pint flasks), Waterskin, Pouch, belt containing (1 cp, 9 sp, 0 gp, 0 pp), and one bar of Soap (1 lb.).

This character did not have enough money left to buy Armor with, perhaps he'll find magic armor in some treasure horde, but the main reason to have armor in this setting is to hold magical bonuses. Armor weighs characters down and slows them down, it protects half as well against gunpowder weapon attacks, this includes, pistols, longarms and cannons including chain and grapeshot. An exploding barrel of gunpowder is pretty much the same as a fireball spell, you make a reflex save for half damage if you are in the area of effect.

I am thinking about what sort of adventures this World would offer. Maybe the characters live in a frontier town, such as Boone's Station in the Kentucky area, there are lots of barbarians and monsters here, and a bunch of pioneers trying to make a living, and there is a war about to start between the British Empire and the colonies.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Here is another fighter, these are frontier settlers, kind of all hands on deck when it comes to defending themselves and their communities, so these are militia and family members with hunting and fighting skills, so they are members of the fighter class whether they are officially soldiers or not.
1st level Female Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10+2; hp 12; Init +1; Spd 20 ft.; AC 17, BAC 15, touch 14, flat-footed 16, flat-footed ballistic 14; Base Atk +1; Grp +1; Atk +2 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +2 ranged (1d6 vs small, 1d8 vs med+ /×3, Longbow) Full Atk +2 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +2 ranged (1d6 vs small, 1d8 vs med+ /×3, Longbow) +1 melee (1d6+0 vs small, 1d8+0 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Longsword) AL TN; SV Fort +4, Ref +1, Will +1; Str 11, Dex 12, Con 14, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 18, Com 16.
Skills and Feats: Climb +1, Handle Animal +5, Jump +1, Listen +3, Move Silently +2, Perform (Sing) +5, Ride +2, Spot +4, Swim +2; Dodge, Mobility, Alertness.
Possessions: Studded leather armor, Ferguson rifle, Rifle shot and powder (20), Longbow, Arrows (40), Longsword, Rations (5 days), Pouch, belt containing (0 cp, 6 sp, 1 gp, 0 pp), Backpack, Bedroll, Flint and steel, Oil (2 flasks), Lamp, common.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Another fighter:
1st level Female Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10; hp 10; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 18, BAC 16, touch 15, flat-footed 16, flat-footed ballistic 14; Base Atk +1; Grp +4; Atk +3 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +4 melee (1d3+3/1d4+3 vs small, 1d4+3/1d6+3 vs med+ /×2, Bayonet (fixed)) +3 ranged (1d6+3 vs small, 1d8+3 vs med+ /×3, Longbow, composite (+3 Str bonus)) Full Atk +3 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +4 melee (1d3+3/1d4+3 vs small, 1d4+3/1d6+3 vs med+ /×2, Bayonet (fixed)) +3 ranged (1d6+3 vs small, 1d8+3 vs med+ /×3, Longbow, composite (+3 Str bonus)) AL TN; SV Fort +2, Ref +2, Will -1; Str 16, Dex 15, Con 11, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 15, Com 11.
Skills and Feats: Bluff+4, Climb +2, Handle Animal +3, Hide+4, Intimidate+4, Jump +6, Listen +1, Listen+1, Move Silently +5, Perform (Dance) +3, Ride +3, Spot +2, Swim +5, Tumble+4; Acrobatic, Stealthy, Persuasive.
Possessions: Studded leather armor, Ferguson rifle, Bayonet (fixed), Rifle shot and powder (20), Longbow, composite (+3 Str bonus), Arrows (40), Backpack, Rations, trail (5 days), Pot, iron, Waterskin, Pouch, belt ( 5 cp, 6 sp, 6 gp, 2 pp).

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

This one comes with a light horse.
1st level Female Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10+2; hp 12; Init +4; Spd 30 ft.; AC 17, BAC 17, touch 17, flat-footed 13, flat-footed ballistic 13; Base Atk +1; Grp +1; Atk +5 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +1 melee (1d6 vs small, 1d8 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Longsword) +1 melee (1d3 vs small, 1d4 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Dagger) Full Atk +5 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof 1/3, Ferguson rifle) +1 melee (1d6 vs small, 1d8 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Longsword) +1 melee (1d3 vs small, 1d4 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Dagger) AL TN; SV Fort +4, Ref +4, Will +0; Str 11, Dex 18, Con 15, Int 13, Wis 10, Cha 17, Com 16.
Skills and Feats: Bluff +6, Climb +1, Diplomacy +4, Handle Animal +4, Intimidate +5, Jump +1, Move Silently +5, Perform (Acting) +4, Ride +5, Spot +1, Swim +2; Mounted Combat, Mounted Archery, Persuasive.
Possessions: Ferguson rifle, Rifle shot and powder (20), Longsword, Dagger, Rations, trail (5 days), Waterskin, Flint and steel, Lamp, common, Oil (1-pint flask), Pouch, belt (6 cp, 7 sp, 2 gp, 1 pp),
Horse, Light CR: 1; Large Animal; HD: 3d8+6; hp: 19; Init: +1; Spd: 60 ft.; AC 13, BAC 13, touch 10, flat-footed 12, flat-footed ballistic 12; Base Atk: +2; Grp: +8; Atk: -2 melee (1d4+1*/×2) Full Atk: -2 melee (1d4+1*/×2) Space/Reach: 10 ft./5 ft.; SQ: Low-light vision, scent; AL: N; SV: Fort +5, Ref +4, Will +2; Str 14, Dex 13, Con 15, Int 2, Wis 12, Cha 6.
Skills and Feats: Listen +4, Spot +4; Endurance, Run.
The statistics presented here describe smaller breeds of working horses such as quarter horses and Arabians as well as wild horses. These animals are usually ready for useful work by age two. A light horse cannot fight while carrying a rider.
Carrying Capacity: A light load for a light horse is up to 150 pounds; a medium load, 151-300 pounds; and a heavy load, 301-450 pounds. A light horse can drag 2,250 pounds.
Possessions: Riding saddle, Saddlebags, Feed (2 days), Tent.

Tom Kalbfus

Tom Kalbfus

Another fighter:
1st level Male Human Fighter Human Fighter 1; CR 1; Medium humanoid (Human); HD 1d10+3; hp 13; Init +1; Spd 30 ft.; AC 17, BAC 15, touch 14, flat-footed 16, flat-footed ballistic 14; Base Atk +1; Grp +3; Atk +3 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof , 40) +4 melee (1d4+2 vs small, 1d6+2 vs med+ /×3, Handaxe) +3 melee (1d3+2 vs small, 1d4+2 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Dagger) Full Atk +3 ranged (2d8 vs small, 2d10 vs medium+ /×2 ammo 20, range incr. 40 ft., rof , 40) +4 melee (1d4+2 vs small, 1d6+2 vs med+ /×3, Handaxe) +3 melee (1d3+2 vs small, 1d4+2 vs med+ /19-20/×2, Dagger) AL TN; SV Fort +2, Ref +1, Will +0; Str 14, Dex 13, Con 11, Int 12, Wis 10, Cha 16, Com 12.
Skills and Feats: Bluff +4, Climb +3, Diplomacy +4, Handle Animal +4, Jump +3, Move Silently +2, Perform (musical instrument [drum]) +4, Ride +2, Spot +1, Swim ; Weapon Focus (rifle), Weapon Focus (hand axe), Toughness.
Possessions: Ferguson Rifle, Rifle shot and powder (20), Handaxe, Dagger, Studded leather armor, Backpack, Bedroll, Flint & steel, Lamp, common, Oil (1-pint flask), Waterskin, Rations, trail (5 days), Musical instrument (drum), Pouch, belt ( 4 cp, 1 sp, 2 gp, 3 pp.)

Tom Kalbfus