Chapter 17: A Small-Town Girl (OOC)

506 posts / 0 new
Last post
deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

These things take time. If you keep talking to him you'll open up a major plot point. I'm guessing he goes to war, dies, and we get blamed.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I'm already playing that gambit with Boromil.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

HVB

Opening up too many plot points is bad for our health. Kya is going back inside for now.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I love that I repeatedly say things like, "Everything in this campaign is randomly generated. I don't know what's going to happen any more than you do," and people are still all, "He's developing a plot point, you fool. Stop talking to this NPC before you kill us all!"

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

HVB

I was under no impression that talking to this guy would result in anything, I was just encouraging others to feel free and do something as I wanted the conversation to come to a natural end but also didnt really care if Chuul came out & took a piss or something.

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Chuul showing everyone his dingaling definitely would have resulted in something. His downstairs mixup is as monumental as it is grotesque.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I don't really know that Kya's discussion with Hamas has led to anything much, except maybe that the other players have a little bit better feel for what these two characters are like. If they wanted to be involved in this particular bit of roleplay, then I think they're all perfectly capable of having their own characters get up and come outside.

They didn't, so I'm going to assume they're still around the dinner table, talking about horse dicks, or the weather, or whatever it is people talk about at suppertime on a quasi-medieval farm. I think the conversation ended more or less naturally, allowing for the fact that Hamas isn't exactly Rico Suave.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Kya walks in and Garren finishes, "and to make the horse laugh Chuul told him 'my dick is bigger than yours' and to make the horse cry, Chuul showed him."

Edit (Full version)

Spoiler: Highlight to view

So a man visits a Native American who has a reputation as someone with a mystical connection to horses - a horse whisperer if you will. He has a thoroughbred racing horse that he spent millions of dollars on, but he won't race. The owner offers the man a million dollars if he can figure out the problem and solve it. After spending some time with the horse he determines that the horse is depressed. He leans in, whispers something in the horse's ear and the horse begins guffawing. He's much more energetic and lively and the owner pays and leaves.

A week later he returns and he says, "my horse hasn't stopped laughing since we were here last. The race is done, I want him back the way he was." A million dollars later, the horse whisperer talks to the horse privately and the horse leaves exactly the way he was before the first visit.

A week later the owner returns. He offers $5 million dollars to learn the man's secret.

"It's simple. To make your horse laugh I told him my dick was bigger. To return him back to the way he was, I showed him."

Fixxxer
Fixxxer's picture

I see no joke here. Only truth.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

You're in a "safe" place of sorts, but I'll ask anyway. Are you folks setting any watches for the night? Is anyone going to get up, go outside, and have adventures? Anything like that?

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Want to but I'll keep Avar in the stables.

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Also, he will post watch if others want to. He'll propose 4 hours for him and Garren, 4 for Chuul and Kya and then the morning watch to Alannah and Oskav.

Either way he will post first watch but will stay inside unless there is present danger. I suppose we can cross that if it comes up.

Darker

Alannah does not plan on having adventures. She plans on sleeping. If adventures were the intention, she'd be sleeping on the road and tempting the RNG to making a few encounters.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Noted. I'll wait for a bit, so that everyone has a chance to weigh in.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

HVB

Kya rises before the sun and will go outside to exercise and train for battle. If she must take a second watch she will wake up later, but she wouldn't think it necessary to have three long watches, maybe just two for the late and early hours for those who want to participate.

Fixxxer
Fixxxer's picture

Chuul feels safe enough not to set an actual watch, but he'll sleep lightly, all things considered.

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

The barn may be faerie-proof but it isn't encounter-proof. But Oskav will tempt fate by sleeping until morning.

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

How long is it from the time we bunk down to daylight?

If people who are not arcane casters only get 6 hours of sleep, are they at any disadvantage relative to someone who got 8? If a caster is on watch but doesn't take a standard action, does that time count toward their 8 hours of rest?

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Sunset to sunrise currently lasts about 5 hours, with periods of twilight lasting about half an hour to either side of that. Call it a total of 6 hours of night or night-like conditions. Over the next 20 days, the daylight hours will lengthen by another ½ hours or so as the solstice approaches.

Since you are (I presume) bunking down at roughly the onset of twilight, you can expect to get about six hours if you wake up at the end of the morning twilight period.

If you don't get at least 8 hours of sleep but aren't a spellcaster, you'll probably be fine unless you find yourselves in a chase or forced march situation, in which case you may get tired sooner than you would like. Perhaps more importantly, this caveat extends to your horses, which will feel the impact of overwork much more quickly and decisively than you will. Overall, non-spellcasters are still subject to the fatigued and exhausted conditions, and both of those have timers on them. Fatigue, in particular, persists until you take an eight hour rest or receive certain kinds of magical healing. If Garren were living a sedentary lifestyle in Port Hope, I don't guess it would matter much. But he's traveling on the frontier, which is strenuous and dangerous.

In general, if an arcane spellcaster is in the presence of anything that would be sufficient to wake him from sleep (whether he or she is actually asleep or not), that constitutes sufficient disruption to interrupt his rest. This is a matter of importance for elves, since they don't sleep but still need eight hours of rest. It also is significant for arcane spellcasters who don't need to sleep or need less sleep than normal for various other reasons. For example, a vampire wizard still would need eight hours of peace and quiet every day to revitalize his mind.

So, for example, if people are whispering while Oskav tries to sleep, that's probably okay once he's actually asleep—he'll suffer a -10 penalty to his Listen checks, and the DC is already 15 or so. Oskav has a relatively good Wis score, but I don't think he's got any ranks in the skill, so even if his familiar is near him he isn't likely to wake up. And if it's not happening practically on top of him, he probably would be okay even if he weren't asleep. But a conversation conducted in a normal speaking voice would be a problem.

This test is stricter than the one you propose, based on standard actions. That's the basis for determining whether a disabled character loses hit points, and it certainly overlaps with the one I just articulated; if we put a ring of sustenance on Oskav, I certainly would count it as an interruption of his rest if he were to do anything that consisted of a standard action, even though he wasn't really obliged to be asleep in order to rest.

But I also would consider it an interruption if had a conversation with someone, or walked around, or did much of anything else, including a lot of things that count as move actions or free actions. I probably would even consider it an interruption if he spent the time reading. So I don't think you can rest satisfactorily while also remaining alert enough to react to an imminent threat, and therefore a wizard, bard or sorcerer who is on watch cannot also be resting.

In essence, an arcane spellcaster needs to clear and refresh his mind to prepare or regain spells, and I take a fairly hard line on how that's accomplished. If you want to alter the very fabric of reality by waving your arms and spouting gibberish, there's a price tag on it, involving a need to spend eight hours a day in restful meditation or sleep. You can't multitask around that requirement.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I don't think Oskav has actually cast any spells today, so it may not matter if he gets any rest. I feel like Alannah started the day by checking to see whether Cole has reentered the mortal world, though.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

It matters to Oskav!

Darker

Alannah does her Cole check at night, but yeah, she’ll cast that one spell no matter what.

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

That all makes sense. From a common sense standpoint, a character that chose to sleep only 4 hours every night would likely be tired and cranky after a few days (fatigued), but I don't see anything in the SRD that says not getting enough sleep causes fatigue. By dint of no rule stating that failure to sleep makes people tired, it would appear that foregoing sleep has no negative consequences at all.

There's enough about sleeping in armor and forced marching and 8 hours of sleep allowing recovery from fatigue that it seems like there should be some consequence to not sleeping (or not sleeping enough). I'm hoping to quantify the difference between 6 hours of sleep and 8 hours of sleep. Is it just a penalty to checks to resist fatigue from forced marching? Any effect (including spells) that causes fatigue?

While some sources of fatigue require 8 hours of rest to cure, some don't. For example, a barbarian is fatigued after raging, but only until the end of the encounter. Touch of Fatigue has a duration - you feel fine once the duration ends. That spell indicates that it is an exception and that 'normal fatigue' requires 8 hours of sleep (and waves of fatigue has an instantaneous duration and references the fatigued condition directly.

So, DM call: what is the consequence of staying up all night? What is the minimum required to avoid any negative effects?

Garren is unlikely to become an arcane caster, and he's probably the type to not sleep very much.

HVB

Prefaced with the fact that I don't worry about sleep duration unless characters are wounded so this could be irrelevant.
Personally I wouldn't compare "magic" fatigue to natural fatigue. And I'd equate the barbarian fatigue with something like an intense but quick run that you need a couple minutes to breathe after but it doesn't wipe you out for the rest of your day.
Seeing as how the characters did absolutely nothing strenuous today and even stopped hours before they needed to and in top condition, I wouldn't think that next day fatigue risk coming off of 6 hours sleep would be an issue.
You could probably say your character gets very little sleep as flavor text, but he'd still have to be effectively "sleeping" for 6-8 hours or whatever the appropriate duration is....
In any case, I agree that it would be good to know when or if 6 hours is ok without penalty and when 8 is necessary.
Also I am assuming that us stating that our characters are choosing to "sleep lightly" is not really anything that we have any control over whatsoever, but if so please clarify.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

deadDMwalking wrote:

That all makes sense. From a common sense standpoint, a character that chose to sleep only 4 hours every night would likely be tired and cranky after a few days (fatigued), but I don't see anything in the SRD that says not getting enough sleep causes fatigue. By dint of no rule stating that failure to sleep makes people tired, it would appear that foregoing sleep has no negative consequences at all.

There is no core rule on this, and there are very few "canonical" rulings from Wizards of the Coast on it, either. There is a mechanic offered in the 3.5e supplement Elder Evils, which I quote here in full.

Living creatures that require sleep lose the ability to do so, as their bodies fidget and their thoughts race. Physical exhaustion sets in, and eventually minds break. A living creature can go without sleep for a number of days equal to its Constitution modifier (minimum one). Thereafter it is fatigued, remaining in this state for a number of days equal to its Constitution modifier (again, minimum one); if it would become fatigued during that time, it is exhausted instead. Each day after that period, the creature takes 1 point of Wisdom damage. If the total Wisdom damage exceeds its Hit Dice, the creature is affected as if by an insanity spell. Once its Wisdom score drops to 0, the creature becomes unconscious but cannot recover lost Wisdom naturally. Only a sleep or deep slumber spell or equivalent effect can grant rest for a time, after which the effects of the sign begin anew.

In context, the mechanic outlined above defines the effects of a world-threatening supernatural calamity that prevents people from sleeping. There are several things about it that I don't like, but if you put my back to the wall on this topic, it's certainly on the short list of ways that I might choose to model sleep deprivation.

I think that I probably would choose to handle it using an ad hoc ruling along the lines of what I discussed here: https://www.dndarchive.com/forums/rules-game/sleep-deprivation. It would boil down to an application of something similar to the rules for a forced march.

That there's no penalty for lack of sleep is not entirely true, either. If your character is injured and does not have access to magical assistance, natural healing is dependent upon having had at least 8 hours of sleep in a night. Indeed, a profoundly literalist reading of this snippet of the rules would suggest that elves don't get natural healing unless they go on full bed rest. I don't subscribe to that reading; it's pretty clearly an oversight, and the important part is that an 8-hour rest is meant to indicate that people regain their expendable abilities and other assets, be that hit points, spell slots, or X/day abilities like smite evil.

Furthermore, we have the ring of sustenance to reckon with. It's incontrovertible proof that sleep, starvation, and thirst are real things that characters must deal with. Starvation begins to set in at the start of the 4th 24-hour period without food, calling for a Con check (DC 10, +1 per previous check) to avoid taking 1d6 points of non-lethal damage, which will not heal—even by magic— until after the character has eaten a meal. Thirst works the same way, except that it runs on an hourly timer once it starts.

There isn't a threshold established for when and how starvation or thirst might actually kill a character, since the core rules don't say anything to the effect that you will die if starvation renders you unconscious. But if it becomes an issue in a game I was running, I think you should expect that your character is going to start taking lethal damage at that point, and that the likely outcome will be death unless you are rescued.

These mechanics are very similar to the ones for a forced march, and like a forced march, creatures are assisted by the Endurance feat. So I think I'd be on extremely firm ground if I used a mechanic along these lines to mirror the effects of sleep deprivation.

Quote:

There's enough about sleeping in armor and forced marching and 8 hours of sleep allowing recovery from fatigue that it seems like there should be some consequence to not sleeping (or not sleeping enough).

We agree here. The fact is that the game designers overlooked. But I'm not going to shrug my shoulders and say that sleep is optional.

Quote:
I'm hoping to quantify the difference between 6 hours of sleep and 8 hours of sleep. Is it just a penalty to checks to resist fatigue from forced marching? Any effect (including spells) that causes fatigue?

I think that if you were on short (but not nonexistent) sleep for an extended period of time, I probably would model it along these lines. Prior discussions I've had on this subject have not encompassed the question of how to treat it when a non-arcane character has had insufficient but not nonexistent sleep.

Quote:

While some sources of fatigue require 8 hours of rest to cure, some don't. For example, a barbarian is fatigued after raging, but only until the end of the encounter. Touch of Fatigue has a duration - you feel fine once the duration ends. That spell indicates that it is an exception and that 'normal fatigue' requires 8 hours of sleep (and waves of fatigue has an instantaneous duration and references the fatigued condition directly.

The precedents you've cited all are good models for the principle that you resolve fatigue through eight hours of rest unless it's stated otherwise. Touch of fatigue and a barbarian's rage resolve faster and without rest because they're explicitly stated to do so. Waves of fatigue and the more powerful waves of exhaustion do not show any exception cases, so they have to be cured via rest, or else via the restoration chain of spells—lesser restoration will remove fatigue or lessen exhaustion to fatigue. Magic specifically cannot cure the kind of fatigue that's caused by starvation or thirst, and I'd be inclined to rule similarly for fatigue caused by actual sleep deprivation.

Quote:

So, DM call: what is the consequence of staying up all night? What is the minimum required to avoid any negative effects?

At the moment, I would be inclined to say that I would allow a character to remain awake for 24 hours continuously without calling for a check. At the end of the 25th hour, and every 1d4 hours after that, I would call for a Constitution check (DC 10, +1 per previous check) for the character to avoid taking 1d6 points of non-lethal damage and becoming fatigued. I would consider the Endurance feat applicable to this check.

After the second full 24-hour period, I would ask for another Constitution check (DC in line with the above), the failure of which would change the non-lethal damage progression from the above to an hourly geometric series akin to the one incurred by traveling at a hustle. At that point, I would stop asking for checks and just tell you when sleep deprivation overtakes you.

If you'd been sleep deprived for some period of time prior to the above routine's initiation, I think I would count the number of missing hours of sleep or rest your character had experienced over the prior 24 hours, and impose a penalty of -1 to your Constitution check result for each missing hour. So if Garren tried to pull an all-nighter on two hours of sleep, he'd net a -6 penalty onto his Constitution check. I think he has Endurance as a ranger bonus feat, so some of that penalty would be absorbed by the feat's bonus.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Talanall
Talanall's picture

HVB wrote:
Prefaced with the fact that I don't worry about sleep duration unless characters are wounded so this could be irrelevant.

I usually don't worry about it much, either. There's been one incident in this campaign where the PCs deliberately went without sleep because they were engaged in a lengthy pursuit of the BBEG. Toward the end, sleep deprivation in combination with the effects of a very ambitious forced march was beginning to be an issue. But it never went further than that, and it never resulted in combat, so I didn't formalize my methods into a house rule to track it.

Quote:
Personally I wouldn't compare "magic" fatigue to natural fatigue. And I'd equate the barbarian fatigue with something like an intense but quick run that you need a couple minutes to breathe after but it doesn't wipe you out for the rest of your day.

See my reply to DDMW. They are subtly different.

Quote:
Seeing as how the characters did absolutely nothing strenuous today and even stopped hours before they needed to and in top condition, I wouldn't think that next day fatigue risk coming off of 6 hours sleep would be an issue.

I think it really depends what they end up doing tomorrow.

Quote:
You could probably say your character gets very little sleep as flavor text, but he'd still have to be effectively "sleeping" for 6-8 hours or whatever the appropriate duration is....

In general, I don't care if players say their characters are sleeping or not. The rules call for arcane spellcasters to sleep for 8 hours straight, so if Garren wants to sit up and brood about his time as a werewolf, then whatever. He's obliged to be still and quiet while he does that, so that Alannah and Oskav don't bitch at him.

Quote:
In any case, I agree that it would be good to know when or if 6 hours is ok without penalty and when 8 is necessary.
I think we're probably working toward an answer that will be responsive to this concern.

Quote:
Also I am assuming that us stating that our characters are choosing to "sleep lightly" is not really anything that we have any control over whatsoever, but if so please clarify.

As far as I am concerned, your characters are asleep, or they are not.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Taking out my designer's cap for a moment...

In reality, there are times where we have plenty of time to sleep but for whatever reason, we don't sleep well. That is to say, even under optimal conditions you could wake up tired. But is it really fatigued? I would say it probably doesn't rise to that level for most people.

It's also possible to go a long time with reduced sleep; sleeping 4 hours a night is something that some people do for years and they don't seem impacted.

A Fortitude Saving Throw has a 1/20 chance of automatic failure - that seems higher than my personal experience would suggest. That implies that a something based directly off of Constitution (like drowning) is appropriate. So my thought is a DC 10 Con check with a +1 bonus for each hour slept. A normal person (+0 Con modifier) with 8 hours of sleep (+8) will succeed on a roll of 2 or better - they wake up groggy about 5% of the time. Someone with a +1 or better is never fatigued with adequate rest.

Someone with a +6 bonus could reliably get by with 3 hours of sleep per night, but outside of spellcasters, it probably doesn't matter too much. That's superhuman Endurance anyway, so it seems appropriate.

The main issue I see is that it's relatively static; if you don't sleep for 4 days in a row, you're just making the same check 4 times - it should get more difficult. To address that, there should be a scaling penalty for the number of days since you last had at least 8 hours of sleep - eyeballing it, I suggest -2. I would allow Endurance to apply.

So Garren decides that 4 hours of sleep is all he needs per night... He has a +1 bonus from his Constitution and he doesn't have Endurance (that's a 3rd level Ranger ability). He'd be rolling against a TN of 10 with a +5 bonus; he's 25% likely to send up fatigued on any given day (and if he fails, he MUST sleep 8 hours to remove the Fatigue condition). For some reason I'm confident that I'll roll a 15+ on this check. In that case I'm good on day 1 (20 versus DC 10), but with the TN increasing by 2 each day, on the 5th day with only 4 hours I would BARELY succeed. On the 6th day the TN is 22 and I'd fail... Keeping in mind that I could have rolled badly on any of those checks it isn't something to risk lightly.

Offhand, those values seem to work relatively similar to what I observe - there are people that don't sleep enough for a week or so, but they have to sleep EVENTUALLY. Some people don't sleep much during the night, but they often nap during the day.

Garren would be smart to get 8 hours of sleep EVERY NIGHT so he doesn't have to worry about being fatigued. If he only gets 7 hours, he should plan to get a nap so he doesn't have to worry about an escalating DC. If he can't sleep a full night, there's a reasonable chance that he suffers as a result.

Of course, he's also a cleric, so he could prepare lesser restoration pretty easily and remove fatigue that way. If he really did need to stand watch all night for a week, he could do it with magical aid. Since it's magic, I don't really have a problem with that...

But for kicks, I'd probably make a failure by 5 or more equal exhaustion. If he really did give up sleep completely, eventually the check would be so high he'd necessarily fail by 5; if he devoted two of his level 2 spell slots, though, he could stay awake indefinitely.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I have no interest in elaborating a system to track the overall quality of PCs' sleep. If you get eight hours of sleep (or four hours each of rest and trance, if you're an elf), then you're fine. Since most adventuring parties include a bard, sorcerer, wizard, or some kind of psionic character, it usually isn't an issue just because their needs dictate that you're going to stop and rest for at least that long every day. If you're attacked in the night, each interruption adds 1 hour to the total that your arcane/psionic allies need to sleep.

If you want to roleplay that your character is an insomniac, then by all means do so. Based on our little survey of such rules as exist regarding sleep, fatigue, and the consequences of interrupted or nonexistent sleep, I feel comfortable in remarking that the game is designed so that spellcasters of all sorts must have a period of 8 hours' near-total inactivity before they regain spells, and non-spellcasters need a like period of inactivity in order to heal damage and/or ability damage, regain X/day abilites, etc.

It seems extremely likely to me that most characters will use a part of that inactive time to get whatever amount of sleep is normal for them to need. The actual number of hours your character needs to spend asleep in order to perform at the specifications listed on his or her character sheet is not actually of any interest to me, except insofar as I expect it to be a positive sum.

So if you wish to posit that Garren only sleeps about three hours a night and spends the other five hours tossing and turning, and brooding about how much he misses the taste of raw, red meat, then I am totally fine with that. If he doesn't get in his expected eight hours of fitful slumber, moodiness, shame-filled bloodlust, etc., then he will be at risk of fatigue.

But the only time I'm really interested in tracking the consequences of sleep deprivation is when the PCs are involved in a challenge that calls for them to endure sleep deprivation that is in some way unusual versus whatever they normally do. So if they are engaged in some kind of race against time or there's a scenario at hand where the entire party is obliged to keep vigil for an extended period of time, you may expect to see me call for Constitution checks as described previously.

But otherwise, it'd be stupid for me to exert the effort of tracking this at all.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Who does Avar approach?

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Talanall wrote:

Who does Avar approach?

My apologies, Tal. Missed this question/post. It wasn't anyone in particular. Just progressing the thread as you wrote.

HVB

Kya asks about a bath right after Alannah asks about rooms and BEFORE she asks about halfling favors

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

My mistake.

Darker

Eh, even if that's the case, it's still talk of favors and bathing.

HVB

It doesnt really matter. For making sense in the flow of conversation the one way is what I intended but the other way was funny so that's more important

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Since Avar has his magic helmet can he make out what the halflings are saying?

Talanall
Talanall's picture

You went with the version that operates via command word activation because this allowed you to have a limited duration per day (50 minutes, chopped up in increments of as little as one round at a time as you feel appropriate), making it far less expensive than something that's always "on."

So if Avar says the command word, then absolutely he'd be able to understand them.

See here: https://www.dndarchive.com/comment/25450#comment-25450

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Talanall
Talanall's picture

As a side note, the discussion that originally gave rise to this item seemed to include a possibility of a continuous-use item with the same specs at the same price. I don't know how or why that didn't make it into the linked version, but I'm willing to stand by it.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Nah I agreed to the command word 50 minutes type. I just forgot about the command part. He use it now. Not sure how you want to track the time should this convo get lengthy.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I doubt it'll be a really serious issue unless it somehow turns out none of the eight halflings speaks a language in common with anyone else.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Is there some kind of check Avar needs to make to determine what Ari is? Avar isn't interested in partaking in another drink that places a curse, acts as a sign of servitude, swears allegiance, or costs 300 platinum an ounce.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I suppose you could try Knowledge (local).

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Darker

It’s everyone’s favorite fermented mare’s milk. Delicious.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

That's the cumis. Ari is something related.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Stallion's milk?

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

K: local and a check to get the diplomacy train rolling from the station.

I rolled 1d20+5, the result is 2, 5 = 7.
I rolled 1d20+9, the result is 15, 9 = 24.
Talanall
Talanall's picture

Oh, too bad about that Knowledge check. Avar is just going to have to rely on Darragh's guidance.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

HVB

Avar's all paranoid now. Don't worry, palomino are immune to poison. Drink it!

Fixxxer
Fixxxer's picture

Heh. These poor halflings were having a nice conversation and half our group came over, sat down and took it over.

Board Rider
Board Rider's picture

Eh....it's a common room. Avar offered a drink and they offered a seat. They probably didn't bargain on the topic of conversation but, hey, it's an imperfect world.

HVB

Weird guy walks into bar, sits next to complete stranger, "hey baby, what's in that drink? I mean seriously, werewolves murder everything, amirite. Now tell me what you know about goblins cause you're short like them so I know you know."
This exact conversation is why I don't go to bars anymore...

Pages