Gideon's Justice (OOC)

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Talanall
Talanall's picture

I have no issue with Raphael (although I have NO idea wtf is up with his accent).

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Darker

Thunk distrust magic and men who talk too much.

Cronono
Cronono's picture

I'm going for something like this with the accent:

https://youtu.be/gPlpphT7n9s

I'm changing it every few posts as I'm trying to make it (1) sound right in my head and (2) remember what I was going for based on the days/weeks between posts (!), but that's the gist of it.

MinusInnocence
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My impression thus far is that Raph's mode of speech is one part faithful to the dialect of people from his socioeconomic bracket in Northreach and two parts dramatic/comical exaggeration.

"Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats." - H.L. Mencken

Cronono
Cronono's picture

I'm also trying to emphasize the weight of Infernal on the dialects from Northreach. In my mind, Infernal tends to have lots of vowels, as when the sinner screams: "Aieeeeee!" or "OOOOOoooooooowwwww!"

I could see a language like Draconic involving more sophisticated consonants, with names like Essembramaerytha, Hethcypressarvil, or the unforgettable Thauglorimorgorus. (http://forgottenrealms.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_dragons). Infernal, while certainly structured with rigorous (some would say lawful) grammatical rules, likely sounds a tad more soulful than a language which takes pride in polysyllabic words.

tl;dr - Dragons speak Germanic, Devils are hillbillies.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

I've always imagined that Infernal would be highly Latinate in its pronunciation and structure, excepting that it would be even more highly inflected. Instead of having just the nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, and vocative cases for nouns, pronouns and adjectives, the way Latin does, I would expect it also to an instrumental case (as in, "by means of"), and probably a grammatical mechanism for indicating relative social rank. And likewise, I'd expect the language of devils to have its own special set of verb tenses to indicate when someone is making a bargain.

Modern English is a wonderfully rich language, but grammatically primitive--there's no vocative case, no "polite" form of address (variously present in other languages by using "thou" for intimates, and either a plural or a third person verb/pronoun for polite interaction). Its verbs basically have two forms: "past" and "not past." The future indicative, as well as all subjunctives, requires auxiliary verbs in combination with an infinitive. This last point, regarding the lack of a full set of verb tenses, also applies to most other Germanic languages.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

I agree that I would expect the language of devils to be extremely precise - combining elements of German noun convention (extremely long words that are extremely specific a la Feuerversicherungsgesellschaft [Fire Insurance Company] and as Tal said, more verb forms. Spanish and French both have a familiar/respectful form (Spanish tu/usted) and a plural form (ustedes/vosotros). Which reminds me - one of my favorite scenes from 'Life of Brian' is when a Centurion catches the titular character writing graffiti and corrects his conjugations.

Regarding the character, he's self-described as 'uncharismatic' and has a mysterious past involving devils - Argus doesn't trust him. But they've also been traveling together for only a short time. As the newest party member, he'd be on the short list for 'regretful sacrifice'. Given enough time, I'm sure Argus will learn to think of him affectionately (like the kids in Goonies thought of Sloth).

Talanall
Talanall's picture

It's called a T-V distinction, from tu-vous, although the name is somewhat misleading because a lot of languages use the third person singular as the polite form of address. Spanish does that; Italian would be another example; it uses tu for the familiar, and Lei (normally 3rd person feminine) as the polite, with Lei always taking feminine adjectives and using the third person singular form of a verb. Loro, the third person plural pronoun, is the polite plural; voi is the informal form. But it's worth noting that Loro is almost never used formally outside of deliberately, even self-consciously formal settings. In written Italian, you can tell the difference between actual third person and polite third person because actual third person is not capitalized. So if you see Lei or Loro in a passage, you know it's being used for formal address. Oddly enough, some old dialects of Italian use tu/voi instead. Dante's Tuscan in Inferno, circa 1250, is a good example.

I think most Germanic languages use third person for formal address, as well. Slavic languages usually rely on the second person plural.

To my knowledge, Modern English is the only Indo-European language that entirely lacks some kind of T-V distinction. Early Modern English, circa Shakespeare, still had it, and it declined suddenly and sharply in the 1600s, remaining a feature of rural/local dialects. It still shows up in a few, most notably some northern British dialects. Nobody knows why. Some people argue that you/ya'll is an attempt to reinstate the T-V distinction in certain dialects of American English, but I am unconvinced.

As a side note, Latin does the same thing as German, when it comes to neologisms. E. g. "fistula nicotiana" for "cigarette." Literally, "tobacco tube." Or "vitritersoria," lit. "glass towels," for "windshield wipers." The Vatican actually maintains a staff whose job it is to come up with Latin translations for new things and ideas, because papal archives are kept in Latin. Latin is a dead language in the sense that nobody speaks it natively anymore, but it's still growing.

German's primary distinction in this regard is that it usually mashes the words together into one big word; Latin usually does not, but it can. Most of the time, a neologism in Latin (or any other language) is either a phonetic loan word (which is why the French have "le Big Mac"), or else it's a descriptive term based on the item's function or attributes. That can mean that it's a calque, a literal translation of the origin word (example: flea market in English is "marché aux puces," literally "market of fleas," in French). But it also can be "marteau pneumatique" for "jackhammer."

French is especially likely to take on calques because the French Academy deliberately restricts the "official" adoption of new words.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Open Locks

I rolled 1d20+20, the result is 7, 20 = 27.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

Fixxxer
Fixxxer's picture

A few years back, I wrote a primer for the languages of my homebrew world. This included a description of what the "Fiendish" language might sound like.

https://www.dndarchive.com/content/languages

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

The full details of Lyntern's status aren't really available through any application of the Heal skill that I've found so far. There isn't anything in the rules that explicitly lets a PC know how many hit points or whatever an NPC has. But the bullet points are that he has taken lethal damage from clawing his own eyes out, nonlethal damage from dehydration and ability damage from disease. He's pretty young, probably no more than 17 or 18 years old, so it's unlikely he's working with more than a single character level.

"Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats." - H.L. Mencken

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Dalvar will give Lyntern a drink from his waterskin and leave that with him, along with a helping of rations. He'll also leave his bedroll, since he knows it to be clean as of this morning (Dalvar uses prestidigitation to clean everything he wears or sleeps on every morning and evening). And he'll dig out a clean kerchief from his spare set of clothes, and use it to cover the holes where Lyntern's eyes used to be.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Damn civil of him.

Talanall
Talanall's picture

Dalvar would prefer to sweep the castle for additional survivors, useful supplies, information, etc. before continuing the pursuit.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

deadDMwalking
deadDMwalking's picture

Agreed.

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Arise, chicken. Arise.

Secrets
I rolled 1d20+15, the result is 12, 15 = 27.
I rolled 1d20+15, the result is 13, 15 = 28.
I rolled 1d20+15, the result is 1, 15 = 16.
I rolled 1d20+15, the result is 16, 15 = 31.

"Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats." - H.L. Mencken

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

More rolls

Initiative (surprise round)
I rolled 1d20+3, the result is 10, 3 = 13.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 12, 2 = 14.
I rolled 1d20+8, the result is 7, 8 = 15.
I rolled 1d20+3, the result is 4, 3 = 7.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 9, 2 = 11.
I rolled 1d20+2, the result is 10, 2 = 12.

"Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats." - H.L. Mencken

Talanall
Talanall's picture

B'kaaaaaawk.

Wæs se grimma gæst Grendel haten,
mære mearcstapa, se þe moras heold

MinusInnocence
MinusInnocence's picture

Moving on, folks. These threads will be locked and I encourage everyone to subscribe to the new IC and OOC threads for the chapter, "From Beyond the Stars," here and here.

"Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats." - H.L. Mencken

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